Carrie-Ann Kayan

63 Flips | 11 Magazines | 1 Following | 1 Follower | @carrieannkayan | Keep up with Carrie-Ann Kayan on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Carrie-Ann Kayan”

How to Make Beer Can Chicken

<i>Each week this summer, Cara Nicoletti of The Meat Hook is helping us get to know our favorite cuts a little bit better – and introducing you to a few new ones, too. Read on, study up, then hightail it to your nearest butcher.</i><p><i>Today: It may look a little silly, but the flavor of this beer can chicken</i> …

BBQ

DNA Replication

DNA Replication

Prophase a stage of mitosis in which the chromatin condenses into a highly ordered structure called a chromosome in which the chromatin…

<b>Prophase</b> a stage of mitosis in which the chromatin condenses into a highly ordered structure called a chromosome in which the chromatin becomes visible. (via)

HIV Virus (red) attaching to its host (Via)

HIV Virus (red) attaching to its host (Via)

Cancer cells, photo by Thomas Deerinck, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, La Jolla, California, USA

Cancer cells, photo by Thomas Deerinck, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, La Jolla, California, USA.

Retinal flatmount of mouse nerve fiber layer (40X) Photo by Gabriel Luna

Retinal flatmount of mouse nerve fiber layer (40X) Photo by Gabriel Luna

Micrograph of blueberries

Micrograph of blueberries

Household dust magnified 22 million times contains animal fur, insect scale, insect parts, fibers, and hair (via)

<b>Household dust magnified 22 million times</b> contains animal fur, insect scale, insect parts, fibers, and hair (via)

What healing wound looks like on a microscopic level (via)

What healing wound looks like on a microscopic level <i>(via)</i>

Emotionally Vague is a research project about the body and emotion, asking “How do people feel anger, joy, love, fear, and sadness?” In t…

<i>Emotionally Vague</i> is a research project about the body and emotion, asking “How do people feel anger, joy, love, fear, and sadness?”<p>In the process, 250 individuals were asked to draw how each emotion felt in to them. These are the combined results.<br>(Read in-depth)

An X-ray showing the coronary arteries of the heart

An X-ray showing the coronary arteries of the heart

Why did humans evolve so they have shorter arms than other primates? is it just a neutral trait or is it an advantage?

Why did humans evolve so they have shorter arms than other primates? is it just a neutral trait or is it an advantage?<p>It’s due to the evolution of bipedalism in humans. Humans don’t use primarily their arms for movement, so the arms changed over time to become more suited to carrying/grasping/handling items.

Hand of a premature baby lit to find the baby’s veins

Hand of a <i>premature baby</i> lit to find the baby’s veins. This allows drugs and fluids to be administered intravenously. Photographed at The Sofia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.<p>On a side note, if you use a bright enough light and try this on your own hand, you’ll be able to see the veins running through your hands.

Close up of a moth’s wing (via)

Close up of a moth’s wing (via)

Scientists are learning how to grow custom-made body parts so they can be ready when you—and your vital organs—start falling apart

Scientists are learning how to grow custom-made body parts so they can be ready when you—and your vital organs—start falling apart. At the University of Minnesota, Doris Taylor and her colleagues strip organs of their cells, reseed the organ “skeletons” with living cells, and watch as the organs start working right in front of their eyes. more here

A piece of used dental floss under a microscope, Photography by Steve Gschmeisser (via)

A piece of used dental floss under a microscope, Photography by Steve Gschmeisser (via)

Do you see us humans (ultimately) forcing our own evolution? With the increased knowledge about our exact gene pool and DNA (along with…

Do you see us humans (ultimately) forcing our own evolution? With the increased knowledge about our exact gene pool and DNA (along with other animals DNA and genes too), do you think we'll be able to modify our bodies without nature's say in it?

Scanning electron micrograph of a single red blood cell on the tip of a needle (via)

Scanning electron micrograph of a single red blood cell on the tip of a needle (via)

An invader cell (orange) is surrounded by macrophages (blue) whose function is to engulf and digest such invader cells. (via)

An invader cell (orange) is surrounded by macrophages (blue) whose function is to engulf and digest such invader cells. (via)

Coral sand magnified 100x photo by David Maitland

Coral sand magnified 100x photo by David Maitland. Coral sand is composed of the microscopic shells of single-celled organisms, as well as small bits of coral. (read more)

Blood

Blood

Fantastically nerdy Valentines Day cards made by David Friedman over at Ironic Sans

Fantastically nerdy Valentines Day cards made by David Friedman over at Ironic Sans<p>Happy early Valentines Day to all my followers!

A mix of mouse stem cells that have been encouraged to develop into specialized cells

A mix of mouse stem cells that have been encouraged to develop into specialized cells. Each color is a specific cell type that developed from the previously uniform collection of cells. (via)

Lies, Damned Lies, and Medical Science

Much of what medical researchers conclude in their studies is misleading, exaggerated, or flat-out wrong. So why are doctors—to a striking extent—still drawing upon misinformation in their everyday practice? Dr. John Ioannidis has spent his career challenging his peers by exposing their bad science.<p>…

Simulating 1 second of real brain activity takes 40 minutes and 83K processors

Advertisement<p>32 Comments<p>Credit: Shutterstock / StudioSmart<p>A team of Japanese and German researchers have carried out the largest-ever simulation of …

Scientists create “impossible material”—dubbed Upsalite—by accident

Reaction left over the weekend produces a material sought since the 1800s.<p>Researchers in Uppsala, Sweden, accidentally left a reaction running over …

The Physics Behind Schrödinger's Cat Paradox

Google honors the physicist today with a Doodle. We explain the science behind his famous paradox.<p><b>His feline paradox thought experiment has become a pop culture staple, but it was Erwin Schrödinger's work in quantum mechanics that cemented his status within the world of physics.</b><p>The Nobel …

Astrocytes (in red) are the most abundant cell in the brain and help support neurons (in green) by recycling old cellular byproducts and…

Astrocytes (in red) are the most abundant cell in the brain and help support neurons (in green) by recycling old cellular byproducts and regulating a healthy environment for neuronal function. Unlike other organs of the body where an injury results in a fibrous scar, the brain instead forms an astrocyte scar to promote neuron survival.<p><i>Image by Dr. Shelley Jacobs, McMaster University.</i>