Brian Simcox

7 Flips | 2 Magazines | 1 Follower | @briansimcox7 | Keep up with Brian Simcox on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Brian Simcox”

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Hypnosis: You are getting sleepy ... and calm, and thin, and ...

Ever wonder why some people, even under adverse circumstances, set goals and achieve them effortlessly? Some of them, undoubtedly, are hard-wired to succeed. They just set themselves in a direction and their mind handles the rest.<p>But that ability is atypical; most of us, at one time or another, are …

Six amazing birds

Crows, falcons. gannets, hummingbirds, macaws …. and turkeys. Here’s what makes these six birds so cool<p>Scientists study birds for many reasons—to …

Birds

Your science questions answered

<b>Why is it that leaves have so many different shapes?</b> asks Dieter<p>Despite their many shapes, leaves have certain things in common. "Leaves need to be much longer and wider than they are thick to intercept light for photosynthesis and allow gaseous exchange without losing too much water," says Dr …

How A Battleship Works [Vintage Infographic]

From 1943, a very detailed look at an obsolete war machine<p>The age of battleships is long over. The United States built the USS Missouri, the nation's last battleship, in 1944, even as that category of "heavy ship with many powerful guns" was superseded by "floating runway with many powerful …

Military

Extreme science: from a watery grave to flesh-eating bugs

I've done fieldwork on every continent except Antarctica. My area of research at the University of Berkeley, California, is the taxonomy and systematics of beetles, while I also investigate the evolution of chemical defence. We go out and locate a certain species of beetle, normally by scrambling …

Top 20 things scientists need to know about policy-making

When scientists moan about how little politicians know about science, I usually get annoyed. Such grouching is almost always counterproductive and more often than not betrays how little scientists know about the UK's governance structures, processes, culture and history.<p>So when the Guardian …