Lauren Brenner

68 Flips | 4 Magazines | 3 Following | 2 Followers | @brennerla2014 | Keep up with Lauren Brenner on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Lauren Brenner”

Robots, drones and heart-detectors: How disaster technology is saving lives

<i>Watch "Katrina: The Storm that Never Stopped</i>" Thursday at 9 p.m. ET/PT.<p><b>(CNN) —</b> Robots with cameras, microphones and sensors searched for victims stranded in flooded homes and on rooftops. They assessed damage and sent back images from places rescuers couldn't get.<p>It was August 31, 2005, two days …

Robots

Senate Democrats propose plan to keep in-state UC tuition flat

<i>This article was updated at 8:59 p.m.</i><p>California Senate Democrats proposed Tuesday that the University of California increase its nonresident …

The Problem with Rogue Microbial Factions and Antibiotic Resistance

Extremism is a common problem in the world. Made up of factions of rogue individuals whose methods and actions considered outside the norm, they exist amidst the fringes of society. While this may relate to the human world, this is the reality of the bacterial universe and its population …

Microbiology

New Test Could Diagnose Asthma With A Single Drop Of Blood

The test works by gauging the speed of white blood cells.<p>While some symptoms of asthma, like wheezing, are obvious, a diagnosis of asthma is not always clear cut, especially if they don't occur when patients are with their doctors, and involve trials of lung function and tests for allergies. But …

Medicine

Blood recycling machine gets 3D-printed upgrade

A transfusion machine that takes a person's blood lost during an operation, filters it, and then puts it back into the body has been improved through …

Sugars may act as mirrors into cancer cells

Carbohydrate molecules may serve as signals for cancer, pointing to new ways in which sugars can be used to look at the inner workings of …

Genetically engineered white blood cells could be the future of HIV treatment

Scientists have successfully modified the white blood cells of 12 patients living with HIV, making their cells resistant to the retrovirus and improving the study participants' overall ability to fight off infection. The researchers achieved this result through a gene editing technique, described …

Discovery may lead to vaccine for all 4 types of dengue

Researchers have discovered a new target for human antibodies that may lead to a vaccine for all four types of dengue virus—and may also have …

Disorder of neuronal circuits in autism is reversible, new study suggests

People with autism suffer from a pervasive developmental disorder of the brain that becomes evident in early childhood. Medical researchers have …

Can engineered bacteria make biofuel for missiles?

Researchers have engineered a bacterium to synthesize pinene, a hydrocarbon produced by trees that could potentially replace high-energy fuels, such …

Registrant WHOIS contact information verification

3D scan quickly shows if chemo kills liver cancer

New 3D scans of liver cancer quickly show if chemotherapy is working, precisely measuring living and dying tumor tissue, researchers report.<p>The …

Math that predicts glucose paves way for artificial pancreas

A mathematical model can predict with more than 90 percent accuracy the blood glucose levels of individuals with type 1 diabetes up to 30 minutes …

Early education can improve health 30 years later

High-quality early childhood development programs with health care and nutritional components can help prevent or delay the onset of adult chronic …

First synthetic yeast chromosome built

Julie Steenhuysen<p>Related Stories<p>Scientists create synthetic life, Science Online, 27 May 2010<br>• Yeast assembles synthetic genome, Science Online, 08 Dec …

Nanofiber bandages could safely seal your next wound

Over-the-counter liquid bandages are great for sealing up minor cuts and scrapes, but sutures are still required to close most surgical incisions and deeper wounds. A group of scientists at the University of Maryland, however, have devised a way to apply a layer of 370 nanometer-wide biodegradable …

Neurosurgeons successfully implant 3D printed skull

A 22-year-old woman from the Netherlands who suffers from a chronic bone disorder -- which has increased the thickness of her skull from 1.5cm to …

Seeing Cells As They’re Meant To Be Seen: In 3-D

Here's the big picture<p>Cells live in a three-dimensional world, but until recently, scientists using fluorescence microscopes could see them well in only two dimensions. With advances in confocal microscopes, which use pinhole apertures to focus light on several planes, scientists can now view …

Black death skeletons reveal pitiful life of 14th-century Londoners

The 25 skeletons unearthed in the Clerkenwell area of London a year ago may hold the key to the truth about the nature of the Black Death that ravaged Britain and Europe in the mid-14th century.<p>A Channel 4 documentary on Sunday will claim that analysis of the bodies and of wills registered in …

Are Calorie Counts on Nutrition Labels Making Us Fat?

Misleading calorie counts on nutrition labels may be steering us toward energy-dense, processed foods.<p><i>Part of our weekly "In Focus" series—stepping back, looking closer.</i><p><b>For the first time in two decades, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed sweeping changes to the familiar nutrition</b> …

The future of safe sex?

Once mocked as having the erotic appeal of a jellyfish, the female condom is being reinvented as the next big thing in protective sex. Emily Anthes takes an in-depth investigation to see what chance it has of catching on this time around.<p>In 1987, an American pharmaceutical executive called Mary Ann …

This Pacemaker Membrane Can Keep A Heart Beating Perfectly

The pacemaker of the future looks crazy<p>You're looking at what might be the pacemaker of a decade from now: a custom-made membrane, developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis, that slides over a heart and keeps it regulated by a …

Washington University in St. Louis

Those BPA-free plastics you thought were safe? Think again.

Looking for news you can trust?<br>Subscribe to our free newsletters.<p>Inside the Big Tobacco-style campaign to bury the disturbing evidence about the …

How ‘Cinderella cancers’ are coming in from the cold

Cancer Research UK is determined to tackle the challenges presented by four hard-to-treat types of the disease – brain, lung, pancreatic and oesophageal<p><b>This page forms part of a series on scientific breakthroughs »</b><p>Someone diagnosed with breast cancer today has an 85 per cent chance of beating the …

Tiny sensors can tell if antibiotics are working

A new way to measure the level of antibiotics in the blood—and how well they’re working—could be a first step toward personalized treatments for …

Could strawberry essence make food taste sweeter?

Scientists believe they have pinpointed the exact compounds in strawberries that give the fruit its unique flavor, a finding that could help breeders …

Acid test: LSD used as drug therapy for the first time in 40 years

Swiss scientists broke a four-decade-long informal ban on LSD research yesterday when they announced the results of a study in which cancer patients received the drug to curb their anxiety about death.<p>The study, which was published in the <i>Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease</i>, looked at the safety …

The price of a long, healthy life may be reduced fertility | David Cox

Suppressing a hormone that governs metabolism boosts your chances of living to a grand old age, but there's a downside<p>Would you be prepared to sacrifice your fertility in order to live longer? It's an almost inconceivable dilemma, but one day we could be offered a choice between having children and …

Geneticist's startup hopes to defeat human aging with world's largest genome library

Geneticist J. Craig Venter, who has made headlines for his genomic research and helping develop what's been called the first synthetic life form, is launching a new company with the goal of delaying aging and extending human lives. Human Longevity, Inc. is co-founded by Venter, biotechnologist and …