kim kapfhammer

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Reports of flesh-rotting drug krokodil popping up in Oklahoma and NYC clubs

As awareness of the super-addictive substance spreads, doctors are sounding the alarm<p>There have now been at least eight cases of the skin-rotting Russian drug krokodil reported in the US, according to medical professionals who spoke with <i>The Verge</i>, and at least three resulted in death.<p>Krokodil is …

A Malaria Vaccine That Cuts 46% of Infections Is a 100% a Big Deal

A promising new vaccine cut malaria infections by 46 percent in a recent study. Kent Sepkowitz explains why this is the biggest science news of the …

Protein discovery may mean fewer hysterectomies

A new model could help uncover the cause of a common gynecological disease associated with 66 percent of hysterectomies.<p>For a new study published in …

U.S. doctors still prescribing way too many antibiotics

Only 10 percent of adult sore throat cases are caused by bacteria, but 60 percent of these patients are given antibiotics.<p>When people seek medical …

To diagnose eye disease, check urine

Researchers have discovered a link between what’s in someone’s urine and gene mutations that can cause retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a degenerative …

Researcher stumbles upon possible new tick species inside his own nose

After returning from an African research expedition, pathobiology professor Tony Goldberg found an unexpected stowaway: a tick hiding up his right nostril. “When you first realize you have a tick up your nose, it takes a lot of willpower not to claw your face off," Goldberg, a University of …

'Just flooding us': Tenn. spike in drug-dependent newborns is warning to nation

On an average day, neonatal nurse practitioner Carla Saunders faces two dozen babies born hooked on drugs, infants so sick with the pain of withdrawal that they cry nonstop, claw their faces and writhe in agony at the sound of a voice or the touch of hand. But that’s just the average.<p>“Today, it may …

Pulses of light turn on cancer ‘death signal’

Researchers have created a peptide—a small piece of protein—that when linked to a light-responsive dye is able to switch on death pathways in cancer …

New evidence that sports supplement “Craze” contains a meth-like synthetic drug that’s never been tested on humans

If you’re in the mood to experiment with a powerful synthetic drug, pick yourself up a tub of Craze, bodybuilding.com’s 2012 pick for pre-workout supplement of the year. You “have NOT Experienced Workout Energy Like <i>This</i>,” promises the supplement’s maker.<p>There’s a very good reason for that: There is …

Ann Arbor

Air pollution causes cancer, WHO concludes

Air pollution has been listed as a leading cause of lung cancer by a World Health Organisation team tasked with identifying environmental carcinogens.<p>Fresh air polluted by exhaust fumes and industrial emissions causes lung cancer, a team of World Health Organisation experts has officially …

Bright eyes, clean brains: sleep might scrub away gray matter waste

A new theory on why we need shut-eye<p>It's long been known that sleep, much like eating or breathing, is a vital process for humans and animals. Insufficient shut-eye in people impairs cognition, curbs energy levels, and has been linked to a bevy of illnesses. But while scientists have explored …

Nicotine patches work best for ‘fast metabolizers’

The same gene that controls how quickly smokers process nicotine also predicts how those who try to quit will respond to nicotine replacement therapy.<p>…

Young adults with migraines at higher risk for depression

Women under 30 who suffer from migraines have six times the odds of depression compared to those over age 65, report researchers.<p>The prevalence of …

Why do we sleep? To clean our brains, say US scientists

Scientists in the US claim to have a new explanation for why we sleep: in the hours spent slumbering, a rubbish disposal service swings into action that cleans up waste in the brain.<p>Through a series of experiments on mice, the researchers showed that during sleep, cerebral spinal fluid is pumped …

Obamacare team a mystery

The “best and the brightest” also appear to be the cloaked and elusive.<p>President Barack Obama insists he’s culled the country’s tech elite to help repair the mangled Healthcare.gov website. But the administration hasn’t made its smart new crew public, and any of the tech companies or federal …

Why Scientists Are Trying Viruses To Beat Back Bacteria

Not all viruses are bad for us. Some of them might even help up us fight off bacterial infections someday.<p>Naturally occurring viruses called bacteriophages attack specific types of bacteria. So researchers at the University of Leicester decided to try and take advantage of phages' …

Inflammation alone can cut ‘healthspan’

Scientists have spotted a common trigger of inflammation-driven loss of function that causes insulin-resistance, bone loss, frailty, and cognitive …

Could one cancer test find unrelated tumors?

Researchers looked at 12 major types of cancer and identified 127 repeatedly mutated genes that seem to drive the development and progression of a …

Scientists discover DNA body clock

A US scientist has discovered an internal body clock based on DNA that measures the biological age of our tissues and organs.<p>The clock shows that while many healthy tissues age at the same rate as the body as a whole, some of them age much faster or slower. The age of diseased organs varied hugely, …

First child 'functionally cured' of HIV remains in remission, scientists announce

In March, a team of medical researchers revealed that a two-year-old patient had been "functionally cured" of HIV after undergoing unusually early treatment with antiretroviral drugs. The instance marked the second documented case of HIV remission, and was the first such case involving a …

Drug may limit brain damage after stroke

An experimental drug appears to reduce brain damage, eliminate brain hemorrhaging, and improve motor skills in older stroke-afflicted mice.<p>The drug …

FDA approves more powerful painkiller

WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has approved a stronger, single-ingredient version of the painkiller hydrocodone, the widely-abused prescription medicine for chronic pain.<p>The agency said it approved the pill Zohydro for patients with pain that requires, daily, around-the-clock …

FDA

Science Weekly podcast: female fertility and ageing

This week on Science Weekly with <b>Alok Jha</b> we hear from leading reproductive biologist <b>Professor Mary Herbert</b> of the Institute for Ageing and Health at the University of Newcastle about the latest scientific understanding of fertility and ageing in women.<p>Prof Herbert, in conversation with <b>Natalie</b> …

Obesity linked to early puberty in girls, study finds

There’s yet another reason to worry about the obesity epidemic among America’s kids: Extra weight may be sending U.S. girls into puberty earlier than ever.<p>Researchers have found that girls with higher body mass index, a ratio of height and weight, may start developing breasts more than a year …

Jealousy: it's in your genes | Daniel Freeman and Jason Freeman

The green-eyed monster of jealousy may be hardwired into our DNA, but there is a lot we can do to keep it under control<p>How would you feel if you suspected your partner had enjoyed a one-night stand while away on holiday without you? What if, instead of having sex on the trip, you believed she or he …

Why Dengue and Yellow Fever Could Be Coming to a City Near You

The Flu Shot May Cut Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

Getting the flu vaccine may protect not only against the flu, but in some people, it may also reduce your risk of experiencing heart attack and stroke. According to a new study out in the <i>Journal of the American Medical Association,</i> though the flu vaccine had previously been linked to reduced …

Johnson & Johnson To Pay $2.2 Billion In Marketing Settlement

Like professional baseball, the drug industry may need to slap asterisks next to some of its standout sales accomplishments.<p>Johnson & Johnson became the latest drugmaker to reach a costly agreement with the federal government over charges of improper marketing. The widely anticipated settlement, …

First Reported Case Of MERS In Spain

The first case of Middle East respiratory syndrome, also known as MERS, has been identified in Spain, according to news reports.<p>The Associated Press reported that the case is a woman, who was born in Morocco but lives in Spain, and that she likely contracted the virus while traveling in Saudi …