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Your Complete Guide To White Wine [Infographic]

Or, how to get smashed with class<p>So you're about to order a bottle of tasty white wine! Do you want dry, very dry, or off-dry? And what ratio of melon-ness to butterscotch-ness do you want? What about saltiness? Stonefruit-ness? If you don't know, your waiter will look at you through eyes swollen …

Roll over Einstein: meet Weinstein | Alok Jha

There are a lot of open questions in modern physics.<p>Most of the universe is missing, for example. The atoms we know about account for less than 5% of …

What It's Like To See Through Google Glass

But now it's time to reveal what it looks like to actually see through Glass.<p>Google Glass and Android game developer Laura Ockel recently recorded a video of the user interface shown through the Glass device. Ockel and her company, Tesseract Mobile, are also the developers behind the unofficial …

APOD: Wringing a Wet Towel in Orbit (2013 Apr 24) Video Credit: CSA, ASC, Expedition 35 http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130424.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8TssbmY-GM Explanation: What happens if you wring out a wet towel while floating in space? The water shouldn't fall toward the floor because while orbiting the Earth, free falling objects will appear to float. But will the water fly out from the towel, or what? The answer may surprise you. To find out and to further exhibit how strange being in orbit can be, Expedition 35 Commander Chris Hadfield did just this experiment last week in the microgravity of the Earth orbiting International Space Station. As demonstrated in the above video, although a few drops do go flying off, most of the water sticks together and forms a unusual-looking cylindrical sheath in and around the towel. The self-sticking surface tension of water is well known on Earth, for example being used to create artistic water cascades and, more generally, raindrops. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130424 Starship Asterisk* • On This Day in APOD http://asterisk.apod.com/view_retro.php?date=0424

UK CO2 emissions rising, government advisers warn

<b>A new report has laid bare the UK's pretensions to have cut greenhouse gas emissions over recent years.</b><p>Ministers have claimed global leadership in reducing CO2 emissions and urged other nations to follow suit.<p>But the official Climate Change Committee (CCC) said that the UK's total contribution …

Should we change the Higgs boson's name?

On 4 July 2012, the discovery of a new particle was announced at Cern. It looked like the long-sought-after "Higgs boson", which gives mass to …

Where has all the antimatter gone?

Where has all the antimatter gone? The Universe today is made of matter, but scientists believe that in the beginning, the Big Bang created equal amounts of matter and antimatter.<p>A new discovery at the Large Hadron Collider at Cern means scientists are furthering our understanding of the …

How are humans going to become extinct?

<b>What are the greatest global threats to humanity? Are we on the verge of our own unexpected extinction?</b><p>An international team of scientists, mathematicians and philosophers at Oxford University's Future of Humanity Institute is investigating the biggest dangers.<p>And they argue in a research paper, …

Wellcome Trust taps infectious-disease researcher as new director

Jeremy Farrar, a clinical infectious-disease researcher, has been appointed to lead the UK Wellcome Trust, one of the world’s largest biomedical …