Asep Jamaludin

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Tips Seputar Bagaimana Memanaskan Mesin Motor/Mobil Dengan Benar !

Spoiler for HT Perdana:<p><b>Alhamdulillah Deh.. Thread ane Yang Sederhana ini dipilih jadi HT di Kaskus. Semoga thread sederhana ini bisa membawa manfaat</b> …

Share Resep MIE AYAM - Pengusaha Mie ayam masuk sini,,!!

salam kenal semuanyah ,,, permisi sesepuh sini ya,,,<p>Gan ane lagi cari2 inpoh resep bikin MIE ayam Yang enak di mana ya,,, klo punya linknya tlg share …

How Michael Jordan Made $90 Million In 2013

Nike released the Air Jordan 10 “Powder Blue” retro sneaker on Saturday, 20 years after the first Jordan 10s hit shelves. Like all the Jordan retro releases, this one was highly anticipated and first-day sales hit $35 million. For perspective, in all of 2013, Adidas sold $40 million in the U.S. of …

Google keeps an ever-closer eye on non-Play Store apps

Google is taking additional steps with Verify Apps to protect Android users from potentially malicious non-Play Store apps, even after they've been installed.<p>SAN FRANCISCO -- Android owners who use apps installed from outside of the Play Store will soon find their devices just a smidge safer, as …

Apps

Stunning Underwater Photography of Sea Creatures

From a huge 40 foot whale-shark to a two inch seahorse this vibrant series of Earth’s sea life captures the enigmatic beauty of the deep. …

Underwater Photography

Oppo R819 review: a slim, long-lasting smartphone that faces tough odds

It's easy to think that Chinese smartphone makers are thriving solely on sales of ultra-cheap devices, but that's only partly true. In many cases, they're striking careful balances between features and pricing -- handsets like the Vivo X3 tout sleek designs and big screens, but their modest …

LG G Flex review: a promising phone, but not one you should buy right now

It's not too often we get to review a product with a completely new form factor, but we relish the opportunity when we do. This time, we're taking a closer look at the LG G Flex, one of two curved smartphones that have come out of Korea over the last two months. The idea of a curved device is …

The year in reviews: 2013's best and worst gadgets scored and scrutinized

Fun fact: Engadget reviewed 176 products in 2013, and that's not even counting the umpteen times we got hands-on with stuff at tradeshows and press events.<p>In general, we try to review just the top-tier gadgets, but even then, some of it ends up being forgettable. (Can you name-check everything we …

Pebble Steel review: at last, a stylish smartwatch

Smartwatches are supposed to be pieces of jewelry that are just as personal as the smartphones they're attached to, yet rarely are they thought of as <i>fashionable</i>. We've seen a handful (or is it wristful?) that are hip, ornate and sporty, but we've also admittedly endured plenty of ugly options as …

Sony Xperia Z1 Compact review: a good thing in a small(ish) package

Last year, Sony finally reached the end of the alphabet with its Xperia Z. It wasn't just that the company ran out of letters, though: With the Xperia Z, we saw Sony streamline its scattered phone strategy, piping all its attention into a single high-end device. Then, it followed up with the Z1, …

Oppo N1 review: a cameraphone that puts selfies first

If our articles have been tagged properly, the first mention of Oppo on Engadget dates back to August 2005. No one would have thought that this then-fledgling DVD player manufacturer -- a spin-off from Vivo's parent company BBK -- would end up making some interesting smartphones. It's funny how …

Samsung Galaxy Note Pro 12.2 review: a tablet that proves bigger isn't always better

How do you fit 12.2 inches of tablet into your life? That's a question I'm sure Samsung must have pondered at some point before greenlighting its Galaxy Note Pro 12.2, a device that stretches the upper limits of what we can easily call a tablet. It's also something I've wondered myself, given that …

Samsung Galaxy S5 vs. Galaxy S4

Size<p>The Galaxy S5 is four percent longer and wider than the Galaxy S4. The GS5 is also about three percent thicker than its …

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CONTRACTIONS - Definition: A shortened form of a word or group of words, with the missing letters usually marked by an apostrophe. Contractions are commonly used in speech and in colloquial forms of writing. Words containing two contractional clitics marked with apostrophes (such as shouldn't've) are called double contractions. Double contractions are rarely seen in contemporary writing. - Etymology: From the Latin, "to draw together, make a contract." - Examples and Observations: "Your style will be warmer and truer to your personality if you use contractions like 'I'll' and 'can't' when they fit comfortably into what you're writing. . . . There's no rule against such informality--trust your ear and your instincts." (William Zinsser, On Writing Well. HarperCollins, 2006) "So there we all were so ugly we couldn't bear to look at one another. So then what did we do? Well, I'll tell you what we did. . . . We thought we'd rather be invisible than go on being as ugly as all that. And why? Because we'd like it better." (C. S. Lewis, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, 1952) "I have a friend who is a juggler. If I'm at his house, I don't like to take food from him, if it's in threes. He has three apples left, I guess I can't have one. I wouldn't want to screw up his practice routine." (Mitch Hedberg) "You'll look, and there she'll stand. The sunshine won't look gold any more, or the roses pink, or the sky blue, because she'll be the pinkest, bluest, goldest thing of all. You'll be yelling yourself hoarse with the jealousy of her." (Gene Stratton-Porter, Freckles, 1904) "I liked loners. The downside, of course, was that every serial killer who'd ever lived had also been a loner. Well, you can't have everything. People just tend to drive you crazy after a while. That's why penthouses, nunneries, sailboats, islands, and jail cells do such a booming business. And trailers." (Kinky Friedman, Armadillos and Old Lace, 1994) "In a real dark night of the soul it is always three o'clock* in the morning, day after day." (F. Scott Fitzgerald) * "O'clock" is short for "of the clock." - Dialectal Contractions: "Don't you set down on the steps. 'Cause you finds it's kinder hard. Don't you fall now-- For I'se still goin', honey, I'se still climbin', And life for me ain't been no crystal stair." (Langston Hughes, "Mother to Son") - "Y'all been looking at me fuh eight years now, but look lak some uh y'all been lookin' on me wid unseein' eye. When Ah speak tuh you from dis pulpit, day ain't me talkin', dat's de voice uh God speakin' thru me." (Zora Neale Hurston, Jonah's Gourd Vine, 1934) - Contracted Forms: "In English certain words have contracted ('shortened') forms. The word will can occur either as will in sentences such as They will go, or in contracted form, spelled 'll, in sentences such as They'll go. The form 'll is a bound morpheme in that it cannot occur as an independent word and must be attached to the preceding word or phrase (as in they'll or The birds who flew away'll return soon, respectively). Other contractions in English include 's (the contracted form of is, as in The old car's not running anymore), 've (the contracted form of have, as in They've gone jogging), 'd (the contracted form of would, as in I'd like to be rich), and several other contracted forms of auxiliary verbs. These contracted forms are all bound morphemes in the same sense as 'll." (Adrian Akmajian et al., Linguistics: an Introduction to Language and Communication, 5th ed. MIT Press, 2001) - Verbs That Don't Contract: "There are two modals that do not form contractions with not. May does not contract . . .. Shan't exists as a contraction of shall not only in British English and is restricted largely to use with a first person pronoun." (Ron Cowan, The Teacher's Grammar of English. Cambridge Univ. Press, 2008) - Ambiguous Contractions: "The 'd and 's contractions each have two meanings: 'd can represent either had or would, and 's can represent either is or has. To human readers, the intended meaning is usually clear from the context. If you are using machine-translation software, or if you are concerned about this ambiguity for other reasons, then use 'd only to represent would, and use 's only to represent is. Those meanings are the most common in technical communication." (John R. Kohl, The Global English Style Guide: Writing Clear, Translatable Documentation for a Global Market. SAS Institute, 2008) - Double and Multiple Contractions: "In English, at least, contractions typically don't pile up on each other. So she is not can be contracted to either she isn't or she's not, but not to *she'sn't. And of them can be contracted to either o'them or of'em, but not to *o'em. The reason may often be the relative unpronounceability of a double contraction, in which unusual sequences of vowels or consonants are brought together." (James R. Hurford, Grammar: A Student's Guide. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1994) > I'd've talked / I'd'a talked At first glance, the conditional perfect appears to be every bit as much of a high registered tense as the future perfect, yet multiple contractions--including the second of these in which have is reduced to a schwa--are highly frequent in colloquial speech, especially in northern/northeastern lects of American English and in both the if-clause and the result clause . . ., thus: [If] I'd'a seen him in time I'd'a warned him off [cf. the more standard If I had seen him in time I would have warned him off; note that I'd'a seen him is a contraction of the pleonastic If I would have seen him, itself a stigmatized usage."

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