Ariel Elliott

8 Flips | 1 Magazine | 1 Follower | @ale7752 | Keep up with Ariel Elliott on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Ariel Elliott”

The Coolest Things We Saw Exploring The Galápagos Islands In Google Street View

Pretend you're Charles Darwin and check out the blue-footed boobies, giant tortoises, sea lions and more.<p><i>Click here to enter the gallery</i><p>Not everyone can explore the Galápagos Islands. There are a couple of flights and a handful of hotels on the inhabited islands, but you need a guide to take you to …

Earth’s wobble ‘fixes’ food for ocean creatures

The cyclic wobble of the Earth on its axis controls the production of “fixed” nitrogen, which is essential to the health of the ocean, according to a …

Earth Science

Ocean species relocate in response to climate change, study finds

As climate change heats our oceans, you'd expect temperature-sensitive marine species to flee poleward to cooler waters. So why have some headed to warmer regions toward the equator?<p>Scientists have solved the puzzle. For the most part, these animals are relocating to cooler waters. But since the …

Marine species distribution shifts reflect local climate conditions

Climate change has resulted in shifts in where and at what depths many marine species are found. These shifts have not been uniform, and sometimes …

Molasses spill in Honolulu Harbor poses calamity for marine life

Fish began dying en masse in the waters around Honolulu after hundreds of thousands of gallons of molasses spilled into Honolulu Harbor early this week, and there's nothing officials can do to clean it up.<p>Thousands of fish have died from the sugary sludge. Crabs lay dead along the harbor bottom …

How the diminutive zebrafish is having a big impact on medical research

It begins with sex on the beach. Pairs of zebrafish separate from the rest of their shoal and move into shallower and shallower water, continuing to cavort around each other in rapid, darting movements. When the female reaches ground that is only a couple of centimetres below the waterline, a …