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The #ILookLikeAnEngineer Hashtag Challenges Stereotypes On Twitter

A picture is worth 1,000 words<p>It all started with a recruiting ad for a tech company, OneLogic, seen in transit stations in the San Fransisco area. It featured a woman in a black t-shirt and glasses against a white background, with a positive quote about the team she works with. Innocuous enough. …

Social Media

What will a Conservative government mean for UK science?

In last week’s election, UK voters chose to support a Conservative majority government to lead the country for the next five years. In his victory speech, David Cameron pledged to “make Great Britain greater still”. Science is a pretty great part of Britain: our country punches well above its …

ScienceCasts: Citizen Scientists Discover Yellow Balls in Space

Why scientific truth may hurt

The underlying realities of the world – from Earth’s rotation around the sun to Darwin’s theory of evolution – are rarely obvious or expected<p>All is not what it seems. Much of the universe – from the unimaginably small to the cosmological – is not how it appears to us, and our view is lamentably …

Think you’re so smart? It might just be Google

All the information available online has a strange effect on our brains: We feel a lot smarter than we really are, a new study shows.<p>In 9 different …

Let’s keep talking: why public dialogue on science and technology matters more than ever

Experiments in public engagement, pioneered by the Sciencewise programme, are one of the quiet success stories of UK science policy over the past decade.<p>The need for researchers to escape the lab or the seminar room from time to time, and talk to the wider public about the work that they do, and …

Science

Ask Us Anything: How Common Is Scientific Fraud?

Short answer: At least one in 50 scientists is doing something fishy<p>The troubling truth is that scientists who lie to their peers are rarely exposed. A February investigation revealed that most scientific fraud uncovered by inspectors for the Food and Drug Administration never gets identified as …

Science

How To Time Travel To a Star - Shelf Life #5

We can make science funding go further by better sharing equipment

A new report suggests more sharing of research equipment may be a better way of getting more bang out of the science funding buck than clawing back ‘efficiency savings’ out of grant funding.<p>UK science may be the most productive in the world in terms of top papers produced per unit of funding but, …

Google's Knowledge Vault Helps Rank Sites By Accuracy

Just the facts, ma'am<p>Imagine you want to figure out how accurate something is. How would you go about it? Well, you might go to the library, find the relevant encyclopedia article, and read it. But let's be honest: in this day and age, you'll probably just type your question into Google.<p>Just …

Routers

What makes some people so suspicious of the findings of science?

Photograph: Columbia TriStar/Getty<p>Group Captain Lionel Mandrake, left, and General Jack D Ripper discuss the pros and cons of water fluoridisation in Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. …

9 Things I Want My Son To Know About The Universe

Life is short, and you've got a lot to learn. Here are a few good places to start.<p>His name's William; we call him Billy. That video is him on his birthday.<p>It's a strange thing, because he's barely begun to exist and yet he's already about 1% of the way through the time he'll exist for. He hasn't …

To Explain the World: the Discovery of Modern Science by Steven Weinberg, review: 'fascinating but unbalanced'

A sweeping account of the birth of modern science argues that physics and astronomy were the driving forces behind the revolution<p>There have been many accounts of the historical progression of our understanding of the world around us, especially focusing on the transformative developments that began …

Solar System

March 2015

The FDA doesn't tell you when it finds scientific fraud

'Out of sight, out of mind, out of the peer-reviewed literature'<p>In at least 57 clinical trials conducted from 1998 to 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration found evidence of falsification, problems with reporting side-effects, inadequate record-keeping, and more. But only three of the resulting …

Can science be the solution if it is part of the problem?

Science and innovation should help societies tackle the problems of social inequality. But perhaps they are implicated in the problem. <b>Melanie Smallman</b> looks back at Davos to consider the World Economic Forum’s love affair with science<p>The World Economic Forum brought together the world’s richest and …

Scandals prompt return to peer review and reproducible experiments

High-profile fraud has galvanised scientists to urge a return to a crucial element of the scientific method<p>Diederik Stapel, a professor of social psychology in the Netherlands, had been a rock-star scientist – regularly appearing on television and publishing in top journals. Among his striking …

The Top 10 Worst Jobs In Science

These down-and-dirty labors are hard, dangerous, and outright gross—and people love them anyway<p><i>This article was originally published in the February 2015 issue of</i> Popular Science, <i>under the title "The Worst Jobs In Science".</i><p><i>Check out our other coverage of best/worst jobs in science here.</i>

Blood Alcohol Level

March 2015

Crowdfunded science: harnessing the wisdom of the crowd, or selling out?

Illustration: Lunar Missions<p>Millions of small payments from the public could put Lunar Mission One on the moon.<p>276<p>http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2015/1/1/1420128212809/5bbca3d9-ee1c-48dd-8687-6d06e6d0abbc-460x276.jpeg<p>460<p>Illustration: Lunar Missions<p>Millions of small …

Would You Take This Bet?

Scientists Often Skip A Simple Test That Could Verify Their Work

There's a simple test that scientists could use to make sure the cells they're studying in the lab are what they think they are. But most of the time, academic scientists don't bother.<p>That omission is a problem. One study found that between 18 percent and 36 percent of all cell lines have been …

Open access and the direction of travel in scholarly publishing

Recent moves by established journals to make research papers freely available signpost the direction of travel in academic publishing<p>What strange times we live in. As the world wide web has wrapped the globe in an ever-tighter network of connections, it has slowly transformed the look and feel of …

In A Face-To-Face GMO Debate, The "For" Side Wins

Will the debate sway you?<p>Last night, about 450 people packed into New York City's Kaufman Center to hear a genetics professor and Monsanto's chief technology officer debate against researchers who are against the use of any genetic engineering technology. Among the audience members were writers for …

Agriculture

Colorectal Cancer Cases Are Dropping — Except Among Young Adults

The number of Americans getting and dying from colorectal cancer has been dropping steadily except for one group — younger adults.<p>Transcript<p>ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:<p>Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the United States. It kills more than 50,000 Americans each year. The number …

How does cancer spread through the body? - Ivan Seah Yu Jun

6 Bizarre Correlations | What the Stuff?!

Why The Full Moon is Better in Winter