Greek History

By Ancient History Encyclopedia www.ancient.eu | All the most popular articles on ancient Greece from Ancient History Encyclopedia. Including mythology, wars, art, personalities and more.

The Delian League, Part 5: The Peace of Nicias, Quadruple Alliance, and Sicilian Expedition (421/0-413/2 BCE)

The fifth phase of the Delian League begins with the Peace of Nicias – a settlement that settled nothing – and ends with the start of the Decelean …

Ancient History

The Delian League, Part 4: The Ten Years War (431/0-421/0 BCE)

The fourth phase of the Delian League encompasses the first part of the Great Peloponnesian War, also referred to as the Ten Years War, sometimes …

Ancient History

Tegea

Tegea was an ancient Greek city-state or polis in the southeast of Arcadia in the Peloponnese. The city participated in wider Greek affairs such as …

Ancient History

The Delian League, Part 3: From the Thirty Years Peace to the Start of the Ten Years War (445/4–431/0 BCE)

The third phase of the Delian League begins with the Thirty Years Peace between Athens and Sparta and ends with the start of the Ten Years War (445/4 …

Ancient History

The Delian League, Part 2: From Eurymedon to the Thirty Years Peace (465/4-445/4 BCE)

The second phase of the Delian League’s operations begins with the Hellenic victory over Mede forces at Eurymedon and ends with the Thirty Years …

Ancient History

The Delian League, Part 1: Origins Down to the Battle of Eurymedon (480/79-465/4 BCE)

The modern term Delian League refers to the primarily maritime συμμᾰχία or symmachy (offensive-defensive alliance) among various Greek poleis, which …

Greece

The Olive in the Ancient Mediterranean

Olives and olive oil were not only an important component of the ancient Mediterranean diet but also one of the most successful industries in …

Ancient History

Epicurus

Epicurus (341 BCE – 270 BCE) was an ancient Greek philosopher, the founder of the Epicurean school in Athens, who taught that "Pleasure is the …

Greece

Amphora

An amphora (Greek: <i>amphoreus</i>) is a jar with two vertical handles used in antiquity for the storage and transportation of foodstuffs such as wine and …

Ancient Rome

Wine in the Ancient Mediterranean

Wine was the most popular manufactured drink in the ancient Mediterranean. With a rich mythology, everyday consumption, and important role in rituals …

Food & Dining

The Plague at Athens, 430-427 BCE

In the 2nd year of the Peloponnesian War, 430 BCE, an outbreak of plague erupted in Athens. The illness would persist throughout scattered parts of …

Ancient Greece

Hellenistic Warfare

When Alexander the Great died in 323 BCE, he left behind an empire devoid of leadership. Without a named successor or heir, the old commanders simply …

Alexander the Great as a God

The age-old concept of the “divine right of kings” allowed that a country’s ruler received his or her power or authority from God. However, few, if …

Alexander the Great

Women in Ancient Greece

Women in the ancient Greek world had few rights in comparison to male citizens. Unable to vote, own land, or inherit, a woman’s place was in the home …

Greece

Magic in Ancient Greece

For the Greeks magic (<i>mageia</i> or <i>goeteia</i>) was a wide-ranging topic which involved spells and evil prayers (<i>epoidai</i>), curse tablets (<i>katadesmoi</i>), …

Greece

Food Agriculture in Ancient Greece

The prosperity of the majority of Greek city-states was based on agriculture and the ability to produce the necessary surplus which allowed some …

Greece

Greek Coinage

The coinage of ancient Greece has given us some of the most recognisable images from antiquity as they were stamped with designs to proudly declare …

Wars of the Diadochi

On June 10, 323 BCE Alexander the Great died in Babylon. Although historians have debated the exact cause most agree that the empire he built was …

War

Greek Theatre

Greek theatre began in the 6th century BCE in Athens with the performance of tragedy plays at religious festivals. These, in turn, inspired the genre …

The Theatre

Bassae

Bassae (Bassai), located in south-west Arcadia on the slopes of Mt. Kotilion, was an important temple site in the Archaic and Classical periods. Its …

Ancient History

Samothrace

Samothrace (Samothrake) is a Greek island in the northern Aegean which was prominent from the Classical period as a member of the Delian League. Its …

Nike

Lysimachus

Lysimachus (c. 361-281 BCE) was one of Alexander the Great’s trusted bodyguards and a member of his Companion Cavalry. Although he obtained …

Alexander the Great

Cassander

Cassander (c. 355-297 BCE, r. 305-297 BCE) was self-proclaimed king of Macedon during the political turmoil following Alexander's death. Born in …

History

Antipater

Antipater (c. 399-319 BCE) was a Macedonian statesman and loyal lieutenant of both Alexander the Great and his father Philip II of Macedon. As a …

History

Castor and Pollux

Castor and Pollux (the Dioscuri) are figures from Greek and Roman mythology considered the twin sons of Zeus or Jupiter. Semi-divine figures, they …

Greece

Agathocles of Syracuse

Agathocles of Syracuse (c. 361 - 289 BCE) ruled as tyrant of the Sicilian city for over 25 years. Ambitious, unprincipled, and seeing himself as a …

Ancient History

Furies

The Furies (or Erinyes, sing. Erinys) were creatures from Greek mythology who exacted divine retribution from those guilty of wrong-doing. Crimes …

Mythology

Agesilaus II

Agesilaus II (c. 445 – 359 BCE) was a Spartan king who won victories in Anatolia and the Corinthian Wars but who would ultimately bring total defeat …

Greece

Timoleon

Timoleon (c. 411 - c. 337 BCE) was a Corinthian statesman and general who famously defeated the tyrant of Syracuse Dionysius II and an army of …

Ancient History