Asian History

By Ancient History Encyclopedia www.ancient.eu | A selection of Ancient History Encyclopedia's most popular content on ancient India, China, Korea, Japan and more.

To-ji

The To-ji Shingon Buddhist temple complex is located in Kyoto, Japan. Founded in 796 CE, its five-storey wooden pagoda is the largest in Japan, a …

Ancient History

Byodo-in

Byodo-in is a Buddhist temple complex at Uji, south of Kyoto, which was founded in 1052 CE by the important court official and regent Fujiwara no …

Ancient History

Kharosthi Script

The Kharosthi script (also known as 'Indo-Bactrian' script) was a writing system originally developed in present-day northern Pakistan, sometime …

Fujiwara Clan

The Fujiwara clan (<i>Fujiwara-shi</i>) was a powerful extended family group which dominated all areas of Japanese government during the Heian Period …

Inari

Inari is the Shinto god of rice, the protector of food, and bringer of prosperity. He has over 40,000 shrines dedicated to him large and small across …

Japan

Heiankyo

Heiankyo (Kyoto), located in the centre of Honshu island, was the capital of Japan for over a thousand years and gave its name to one of the golden …

Ancient History

Hachiman

Hachiman is the ancient Shinto god or <i>kami</i> of war, divination, and culture. He is famously credited with sending the <i>kamikaze</i> or 'divine wind' which …

Ancient History

Izumi Shikibu

Izumi Shikibu was a writer, poet, and member of the Japanese court during the Heian Period (794-1185 CE). Her birth date is variously given as …

Ancient History

Jomon Pottery

The Jomon Period (c. 14,500 - c. 300 BCE) of ancient Japan produced a distinctive pottery which distinguishes it from the earlier Paleolithic Age. …

Ancient History

Nihon Shoki

The <i>Nihon Shoki</i> ('Chronicle of Japan' and also known as the <i>Nihongi</i>) is an official history of Japan which was written by a committee of court scholars …

Ancient History

Yomi

Yomi, or Yomi-tsu-kuni, is the underworld of the Shinto religion, even if it forms no part of Shinto theology and appears only in ancient myths as …

Ancient History

Saicho

Saicho, also known as Dengyo Daishi (767-822 CE), was a monk and scholar who founded the Buddhist Tendai Sect in Japan. Based on the teachings of the …

Ancient History

Emperor Kammu

Emperor Kammu (aka Kanmu) reigned in ancient Japan from 781 to 806 CE and is most noted for relocating the capital to Heiankyo (Kyoto) in 794 CE. …

Ancient History

Kukai

Kukai or Kobo Daishi (774-835 CE) was a scholar, poet, and monk who founded Shingon Buddhism in Japan. The monk became the country’s most important …

Ancient History

Tenjin

Sugawara no Michizane, aka Tenman Tenjin (845-903 CE), was a scholar, poet, and high-level administrator in the Japanese court during the Heian …

Heian Period

The Heian Period of Japanese history covers 794 to 1185 CE and saw a great flourishing in Japanese culture from literature to paintings. Government …

Ancient History

Ninigi

Ninigi-no-Mikoto, or simply Ninigi, is the grandson of the supreme Shinto deity Amaterasu, the sun goddess. He is the son of Ama-no-Oshiho-mimi and, …

Ancient History

Kofun

<i>Kofun</i> (old tumuli) are large artificial mound tombs built in ancient Japan for the ruling elite between the 3rd and 7th century CE. Many measure …

Ancient History

Manyoshu

The <i>Manyoshu</i> or 'Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves' is an anthology of ancient Japanese poems compiled c. 759 CE during the Nara Period but including …

Queen Himiko

Queen Himiko, also known as Pimiko or Pimiku (183? - 248 CE), was a 3rd-century CE ruler of the territory in ancient Japan known as Hsieh-ma-t’ai or …

Ancient History

Ghosts in Ancient Japan

Ghosts (<i>obake</i> or <i>yurei</i>) appear in ancient Japanese folklore and literature, usually in moral tales designed to both warn and entertain but they were …

Nara Period

The Nara Period (<i>Nara Jidai</i>) of ancient Japan (710-794 CE), so called because for most of that time the capital was located at Nara, then known as …

Tibetan Sand Mandalas

The sacred art of sand painting comes from the Tibetan Buddhist tradition (Tib: <i>dul</i><i>-</i><i>tson</i><i>-</i><i>kyil</i><i>-</i><i>khor</i> – mandala of coloured powders; 'mandala' means …

Spirituality

The Pillow Book

<i>The Pillow Book</i> (<i>Makura no Soshi</i>) is a personalised account of life at the Japanese court by Sei Shonagon which she completed c. 1002 CE during the …

Horyuji

The Horyuji Temple near Nara in Japan was founded in 607 CE by Prince Shotoku and is the only surviving Buddhist monastery from the Asuka Period in …

Haniwa

<i>Haniwa</i> are the unglazed terracotta rings, cylinders, and figures of people, animals, and houses which were deposited at Japanese tombs during the …

Asuka Period

The Asuka Period (<i>Asuka Jidai</i>) of ancient Japan covers the period from 538 CE to 710 CE and, following on from the Kofun Period (c. 250-538 CE), so …

Mount Fuji

Mt. Fuji (<i>Fujisan</i>) is the tallest mountain in Japan and, with its classically symmetrical snow-capped cone, has long been the symbol of that country. …

Four Noble Truths

The Four Truths (Skt: <i>catvari aryasatyani</i>; Pail: <i>cattari ariyasaccani</i>), also commonly known as 'The Four Noble Truths' explain the basic orientation of …