Yasmin Ahayah

26 Flips | 3 Magazines | 1 Like | 1 Following | @Yasmin_Yudah | Keep up with Yasmin Ahayah on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Yasmin Ahayah”

William James on the Psychology of Habit

<i>“We are what we repeatedly do,”</i> Aristotle famously proclaimed. <i>“Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.”</i> Perhaps most fascinating in Michael Lewis’s altogether fantastic recent <i>Vanity Fair</i> profile of Barack Obama is, indeed, the President’s relationship with habit — particularly his …

Cicero’s Web: How Social Media Was Born in Ancient Rome

We’ve already seen that modern social media come from a long lineage of primitive predecessors — from the florilegia of the Middle Ages, which predated Tumblr by half a millennium, to Voltaire’s Republic of Letters, the Facebook of its day, to Edison’s early “viral” cat videos to Félix Fénéon’s …

Henry Miller on the Mystery of the Universe and the Meaning of Life

More than merely one of the most memorable, prolific, and disciplined authors of the twentieth century, <b>Henry Miller</b> (December 26, 1891–June 7, 1980) was also a champion of the wisdom of the heart, a poignant oracle of writing, a modern philosopher. But hardly anywhere does Miller’s spirit shine …

Salvador Dalí Illustrates the Twelve Signs of the Zodiac

After my recent discovery of <b>Salvador Dalí’</b>s little-known and lovely 1947 illustrations for the essays of Montaigne — following in the heels of his 1946 illustrations for <i>Alice in Wonderland</i> — I chanced upon an even more perfectly surrealist series: Dalí’s lithographs of the twelve signs of the …

David Lynch on Using Meditation as an Anchor of Creative Integrity

<i>“Mindfulness meditation is essentially cognitive fitness with a humanist face,”</i> it’s been said. And what more essential cognitive fitness than that required to stay sane in a world that constantly demands more and more?<p>In 2005, the Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield, Iowa, held the …

The Universe in a Glass of Wine: Richard Feynman on How Everything Connects, Animated

In 1961, Caltech took a leap of faith and invited Richard Feynman — champion of scientific culture, graphic novel hero, crusader for integrity, holder of the key to science — to teach the introductory course in physics. At the time, Feynman was a theoretical physicist with no particular interest in …

How Our Minds Mislead Us: The Marvels and Flaws of Our Intuition

Every year, intellectual impresario and <i>Edge</i> editor <b>John Brockman</b> summons some of our era’s greatest thinkers and unleashes them on one provocative question, whether it’s the single most elegant theory of how the world works or the best way to enhance our cognitive toolkit. This year, he sets out on …

A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell’s Ten Commandments of Critical Thinking and Democratic Decency

British philosopher, mathematician, historian, and social critic <b>Bertrand Russell</b> (May 18, 1872–February 2, 1970) endures as one of the most intellectually diverse and influential thinkers in modern history, his philosophy of religion in particular having shaped the work of such modern atheism …

The Art of Thought: A Pioneering 1926 Model of the Four Stages of Creativity

In 1926, thirteen years before James Webb Young’s <i>Technique for Producing Ideas</i> and more than three decades before Arthur Koestler’s seminal “bisociation” theory of how creativity works, English social psychologist and London School of Economics co-founder <b>Graham Wallas</b>, sixty-eight at the time, …

Religion vs. Humanism: Isaac Asimov on Science and Spirituality

Science and religion have a long history of friction as diametric opposites. But some of humanity’s greatest minds have found in science itself a rich source of spirituality, from Albert Einstein’s meditation on whether scientists pray to Richard Feynman’s ode to the universe to Carl Sagan on the …

How To Be Alone

<i>UPDATE: Now available as an illustrated book.</i><p>Modernity offers a curious paradox of connectedness and loneliness. Our perpetually networked selves cling to constant communication in an effort to avoid the deep-seated sense of loneliness we so dread. Somewhere along the way, we forget — or maybe …

What Is Character? Debunking the Myth of Fixed Personality

We’ve previously explored what it means to be human and what defines a “person.” Much of our understanding of personhood hinges on what we call “character” — but what, exactly, is it? Here is an omnibus of definitions and insights from notable cross-disciplinary thinkers, from philosophy to …

Aesthetic Consumerism and the Violence of Photography: What Susan Sontag Teaches Us about Visual Culture and the Social Web

Ever since its invention in 1839, the photographic image and its steady evolution have shaped our experience of reality — from chronicling our changing world and recording its diversity to helping us understand the science of emotion to anchored us to consumer culture. But despite the meteoric rise …

Why War: Einstein and Freud’s Little-Known Correspondence on Violence, Peace, and Human Nature

Despite his enormous contributions to science, Albert Einstein was no reclusive genius, his ever-eager conversations and correspondence engaging such diverse partners as the Indian philosopher Tagore and a young South African girl who wanted to be a scientist. In 1931, the Institute for …

The Human Body: What It Is and How It Works, in Vibrant Vintage Illustrations circa 1959

Much of our inquiry into what makes us human focuses on understanding consciousness, yet we spend the whole of our lives in our physical bodies. As a lover of anatomical art and vintage science illustration, I was instantly enamored with <b>The Human Body: What It Is And How It Works</b> — a stunning …

Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung on Human Personality in Rare BBC Interview

Legendary Swiss psychiatrist <b>Carl Gustav Jung</b> (July 26, 1875–June 6, 1961), along with his frenemy Freud, is considered the founding father of modern analytical psychology. He coined the concepts of collective consciousness and introverted vs. extroverted personality, providing the foundation for …

Godliness in the Known and the Unknowable: Alan Lightman on Science and Spirituality

<i>“If we ever reach the point where we think we thoroughly understand who we are and where we came from,”</i> Carl Sagan wrote in his timeless meditation on science and religion, <i>“we will have failed.”</i> It’s a sentiment that dismisses in one fell Saganesque swoop both the blind dogmatism of religion and …

The Book of Symbols: Carl Jung’s Catalog of the Unconscious

A primary method for making sense of the world is by interpreting its symbols. We decode meaning through images and, often without realizing, are swayed by the power of their attendant associations. A central proponent of this theory, iconic Swiss psychoanalyst Carl Gustaf Jung, made an academic …

Jane Goodall on Science and Spirit: The Iconic Primatologist Talks to Bill Moyers and Reads Her Poem “The Old Wisdom”

Alan Lightman’s superb recent meditation on science and religion reminded me of a 2009 Bill Moyers conversation with legendary primatologist Jane Goodall, in which the celebrated scientist contemplates the question of science and spirit — a question previously pondered by such great minds as …

The Infrared Landscapes

David Keochkerian is a french amateurish photographer. Based in the Somme, he seeks to capture the ephemeral beauty but also to associate different …

quiet night of quiet stars, so many stars

alice doesn't live here anymore, revisited

Shine on you crazy Diamond!