Walt Henry

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The Surprisingly Complicated Construction Work of Simple Sponges

Sponges are animals that do incredible impressions of inanimate objects. They have no nervous, digestive, or circulatory systems. They have no symmetry—no left or right, no front or back. And their bodies comprise just two layers of cells, sandwiching a jelly-like filling.<p>With such simple body …

Manchester researches 3D printed graphene ink batteries

Manchester researches 3D printed graphene ink batteries<p>A government-funded project at Manchester Metropolitan University wants to use the city’s …

A Preview of Graphene 2015: Engineering a 21st Century Wonder Material

AZoNano will be reporting from the Graphene 2015: Engineering a 21st Century Wonder Material conference at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers in …

Graphene

News story: Commercial use of graphene: apply for business funding

Innovate UK and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) are seeking to stimulate exploitation of the high-performance material …

Graphene

Graphene shows signs of superconductivity

Chalk up another superpower for the thinnest material on the planet.<p>When sprinkled with certain atoms, graphene — a flat sheet of honeycombed carbon …

Graphene

New nanomaterial maintains conductivity in 3-D

An international team of scientists has developed what may be the first one-step process for making seamless carbon-based nanomaterials that possess …

3D

The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Platypus Teach Us About Collision-Avoidance?

1/8<p>platypus<p>The platypus is a funny little mammal found in Eastern Australia and Tasmania. Aside from echidnas (the also-very-weird Australian spiny …

Biomimicry

Biomimicry Wave Energy Device Ready To Leave The Nest

<b>Published on</b> July 1st, 2015 | <i>by Tina Casey</i><p>16<p>July 1st, 2015 by <b>Tina Casey</b><p>A new bio-inspired method of harvesting energy from the ocean has completed …

Beetle Biomimicry

Water Factory imitates the catchment method used by the Namib desert beetle. The transparent plastic film in the upper part of the water factory has …

Biomimicry: Designing Cities According to Nature

What can we learn from nature to design better cities? Yaniv Peer tells us about Biomimicry.

Biomimicry

DARPA develops a way for humans to produce their own lifesaving vaccines

ST. LOUIS — The next factory for lifesaving drugs could be the human body itself.<p>Scientists are developing a new vaccine-making method that co-opts …

High-efficiency, semi-transparent perovskite/graphene solar cells created at low cost

With the continued rise in the uptake of solar cells, consumers are now looking at less obtrusive ways to incorporate these in buildings and …

Clean Energy

First superconducting graphene created

University of British Columbia physicists have created the first superconducting graphene sample by coating it with lithium atoms (yellow), shown in …

Chemistry

Solar device shatters records for splitting water - Futurity

A new "artificial leaf" system that uses solar energy to split water and create hydrogen fuel is the safest and most efficient one ever designed.

Clean Energy

Octopi are aliens that live on Earth

An alien on Earth<p><i>This column is part of a series where Verge staffers post highly subjective reviews of animals. Up until now, we've written about animals without telling you whether they suck or rule. We are now rectifying this oversight.</i><p>Are octopi aliens? Maybe! After all, they’re the most …

Zoology

Wasp study finds sting in the tail for cancer cells

Research has found a Brazilian wasp’s venom could destroy tumours of leukaemia, prostate and bladder cancer without harming healthy tissue<p>The venom of the Brazilian wasp <i>Polybia paulista</i> contains a powerful “smart” drug that selectively targets and destroys tumour cells without harming normal cells, …

Cancer

The tiniest Lego: a tale of nanoscale motors, rotors, switches and pumps

Inspired by biology, chemists have created a cornucopia of molecular parts that act as switches, motors and ratchets. Now it is time to do something …

Nanotech

A Tree That Could Stop Wildfires

The thin green line<p>Wildfires are devastating North American forests this summer. Dry, hot weather has pushed millions of acres of trees past their breaking (burning?) point. And while firefighters from around the globe do all they can to save both forests and people, in another part of the world, …

Wildfires

Explosive news: Plants can fight back against TNT pollution - researchers

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Scientists have discovered why TNT is so toxic to plants and intend to use this knowledge to tackle the problem of cleaning up the many sites worldwide contaminated by the commonly used explosive.<p>Researchers on Thursday said they have pinpointed an enzyme in plants that …

Gardening

Here's why farm kids have fewer allergies and less asthma

Farm dust acts on cells in the lungs<p>Kids who grow up on farms are far less likely to develop asthma or allergies compared with the average child — and now scientists think they know why.<p>A study published in <i>Science</i> today shows that bacteria found in farm dust trigger an immune system response in the …

Immune System

How mutant plants could clean up explosives - Futurity

Biologists say plants could potentially help solve a global problem: how to clean up land contaminated by explosives.

University of Manchester Receives £3m Grant from Lloyd’s Register Foundation for Graphene Research

By Beth Ellison The University of Manchester recently received a £3m grant from Lloyd’s Register Foundation for research and development of advanced …

Graphene

'Wonder material' graphene could protect airliners from lightning strikes

British company Haydale to work out how to use graphene to reduce the risk of damage to modern airliners from lightning strikes<p>Graphene could soon be protecting airliners from lightning strikes, with British company Haydale winning a contract to investigate practical uses for the “wonder …

Termites Engineer Solar-Powered Ventilation Into Their Mounds

Central air? No Problem<p>Termites get a bad reputation in the housing business. They are often looked at as signs of the domestic apocalypse, causing billions of dollars in damage to houses every year. But when it comes to building their own homes, termites are master engineers. Such is their …

Engineering

Microscopic "water bears" led researchers to discover a new type of glass

Glass seems pretty perfect the way it is, but researchers are constantly looking for ways to make it better. University of Chicago researchers …

Graphene unlocks super batteries for a greener future

A new generation of energy storage devices is on its way, writes Mark Douthwaite: small, lightweight, efficient, long lived. Just what we need to …

Graphene

Super-Strong Material Inspired By Squid Teeth Is Self-Healing

To repair, just add water<p>A team of researchers led by engineers from Penn State University has created the first material that heals itself in the presence of water, according to a study published yesterday in <i>Scientific Reports</i>. The material, inspired by squid teeth, could be used to repair devices …

Engineering

This material could be used to instantly heal punctures in a spacecraft

Researchers have been working on creating self-healing materials for a while now, and if you look around YouTube, you can find a handful of videos of them in action. But this week a research team described a new material that they claim is even faster at healing, able to repair a puncture wound in …

University of Michigan

Is an artificial tree part of the solution to climate change? These guys think so.

If you want to boil the climate crisis down to one simple problem, it’s this: there’s too much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere these days.<p>Here's the skinny: CO2 traps heat. There’s about 40 percent more of it in the atmosphere today than there was in the millennia of human history before the …

Georgia Tech