Timothy Olsen

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GMO Facts: 10 Common GMO Claims Debunked

Learn About These GMO Facts<p>Later this year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture may approve the Arctic Granny and Arctic Golden, the first genetically modified apples to hit the market. Although it will probably be another two years before the non-browning fruits appears in stores, at least one …

Triple black hole system found in distant galaxy

Researchers hope this may be a good place to look for space-time ripples called gravitational waves<p>Inside most galaxies a supermassive black hole lurks. But one galaxy about 4 billion light-years from us was recently discovered to have not one, not even two, but three gigantic black holes at its …

Road to Mars: JPL scientists prepare for a supersonic test over Hawaii

If the wind blows the right way, sometime around sunset on Friday night, three tractor tugboats operated by P&R Water Taxi will pull up anchor in Honolulu and set off for the aquamarine waters west of Kauai.<p>On Saturday, assuming all goes well, these vessels will collect the sodden remains of a …

APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2014 May 28) Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA - Processing & Licence: Judy Schmidt http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140528.html Explanation: Stars are forming in the gigantic dust pillar called the Cone Nebula. Cones, pillars, and majestic flowing shapes abound in stellar nurseries where natal clouds of gas and dust are buffeted by energetic winds from newborn stars. The Cone Nebula, a well-known example, lies within the bright galactic star-forming region NGC 2264. The Cone was captured in unprecedented detail in this close-up composite of several observations from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. While the Cone Nebula, about 2,500 light-years away in Monoceros, is around 7 light-years long, the region pictured here surrounding the cone's blunted head is a mere 2.5 light-years across. In our neck of the galaxy that distance is just over half way from the Sun to its nearest stellar neighbor, the Alpha Centauri star system. The massive star NGC 2264 IRS, seen by Hubble's infrared camera in 1997, is the likely source of the wind sculpting the Cone Nebula and lies off the top of the image. The Cone Nebula's reddish veil is produced by glowing hydrogen gas. http://hla.stsci.edu/ http://www.nasa.gov/ http://www.esa.int/ http://geckzilla.com/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=140528 #APOD

APOD: Satellite Station and Southern Skies (2014 May 31) Image Credit & Copyright: James Garlick http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140531.html Explanation: This clear night skyscape captures the colorful glow of aurora australis, the southern lights, just outside the port city of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, planet Earth. As if staring into the dreamlike scene, the Tasmanian Earth Resources Satellite Station poses in the center, illuminated by nearby city lights. Used to receive data from spacebased Earth observing instruments, including NASA's MODIS and SeaWiFS, the station was decommissioned in 2011 and dismantled only recently, shortly after the picture was taken on April 30. Still shining in southern skies though, the central bulge of our Milky Way galaxy and two bright satellite galaxies the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds appear in the frame. The Small Magellanic Cloud shines through the fainter red auroral band. http://www.facebook.com/JamesGarlickPhotographer Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=140531 #APOD

APOD: The Space Station Captures a Dragon Capsule (2014 Jun 02) Image Credit: Steve Swanson, Expedition 39 Crew, NASA http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140602.html Explanation: The space station has caught a dragon. Specifically, in mid-April, the International Space Station captured the unmanned SpaceX Dragon capsule sent to resupply the orbiting outpost. Pictured above, the station's Canadarm2 had just grabbed the commercial spaceship. The Dragon capsule was filled with over 5000 lbs (2260 kilos) of supplies and experiments to be used by the current band of six ISS astronauts that compose Expedition 39, as well as the six astronauts that compose Expedition 40. After docking with the ISS, the Dragon capsule was unloaded and eventually released, splashing down> in the Pacific Ocean on May 18. The current Expedition 40 crew, now complete, will apply themselves to many tasks including the deployment of the Napor-mini RSA experiment which will use phased array radar and a small optical telescope to monitor possible emergency situations on the Earth below. http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/swanson.html http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/expeditions/expedition39/ http://www.nasa.gov/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=140602 #APOD

Glasses That Make Beer Taste Better

“What’s your recommended glassware for an IPA?”<p>Brewers spend years perfecting a chocolaty stout or balanced IPA, but when it comes to showcasing their craft, a pint glass serves about as well as a bucket. To rectify this crime against taste, the glass makers at Spiegelau created a line of …

A Convincing Theory About Human Evolution

No ape had done that before.<p>It was an important milestone in the story of human evolution.<p>The ancestor in question, Homo erectus, could use simple tools and hunt. His diet was more meat-based than plant-based. Meat has more calories than food derived from plants. Humans had transformed themselves …

Scientists Use Ultrasound To Read The Heartbeats Of Young Stars

Something as seemingly simple as determining the age of a star has challenged astronomers for years, but now researchers reckon they’ve found the answer in the same technology we use to monitor our own young – ultrasounds.<p>The life cycle of a star is a complex thing. They’re most often born in …