Swastik Swaroop

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NASA serves up first glance at solar system's comet-like tail

Dogs, cats, and comets aren't the only thing with a tail; NASA scientists announce our solar system also has one chock-full of particles.<p>While Earth spins around the sun at around 67,000 mph, the sun rotates around the Milky Way galaxy at a zippy 140 miles per second. With such a massive force …

Astronomy

The World's Largest Building Is Open For Business

It could fit 20 Sydney Opera Houses inside it and has its own artificial sun.<p>The New Century Global Center, a behemoth Chinese officials are calling the world's largest standalone building, has finally opened in Chengdu, the capital of China's Sichuan province. The colossal structure has 5.5 …

APOD: Messier's Eleven (2013 Jul 12) Image Credit & Copyright: Fernando Cabrerizo http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130712.html Explanation: This fifteen degree wide field of view stretches across the crowded starfields of Sagittarius toward the center of our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, the center of the galaxy lies near the right edge of the rich starscape and eleven bright star clusters and nebulae fall near the center of the frame. All eleven are numbered entries in the catalog compiled by 18th century cosmic tourist Charles Messier. Achieving celebrity status for skygazers, M8 (Lagoon), M16 (Eagle), M17 (Omega), and M20 (Trifid) show off the telltale reddish hues of emission nebulae associated with star forming regions. But also eye-catching in small telescopes are star clusters in the crowded region; M18, M21, M22, M23, M25, and M28. Broader in extent than the star clusters themselves, M24 is actually a cloud of the Milky Way's stars thousands of light-years long, seen through a break in the galaxy's veil of obscuring dust. http://www.cacahuet.es/ http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1307/20130706_elevenMessiers950_data.jpg Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130712 #APOD

Big Pic: A Monster Waterspout Spins Over Florida

The water tornado touched down in Tampa Bay this week, and some brave soul got video.<p>Waterspouts, for the unfamiliar, are basically water-tornados, often weaker than land tornados but still <i>completely terrifying</i>. As is the case with this waterspout, which hit Tampa Bay, Fla., on Tuesday.<p>The spouts …

Hubble telescope discovers alien 'deep blue' planet

The heavens are home to an alien world that shines a deep cobalt blue in a solar system far, far away from our own.<p>Astronomers used the ageing Hubble …

Nokia Releases New Imaging SDK, With Yelp, Path, Oggl And Foursquare As Early Partners (But Still No Instagram)

The much-leaked “focus” of today’s Nokia news was its new 1020 Lumia handset with a 41-meagpixel camera, but behind the scenes the company has spent just as much time focusing on what apps would be on the phone to spur consumers to want to buy and use the device. That was spearheaded today with the …

Debate sparked about benchmark for Intel, ARM chips

An analyst raises questions about a benchmark for the Intel and ARM chips that go into smartphones.<p>Nothing like a debate about processor benchmarks to get enthusiasts blood up.<p>EE Times posted a story titled Has Intel really beaten ARM? on Wednesday that calls into question the use of the …

Samsung Galaxy

Tiny Planets PRO2 app review: turn all your photos into tiny planets!

Introduction<p>Tiny Planets PRO2 by Websmith ATP is a novel way to make your photos more interesting. It was updated on May 18, 2013, and requires just …

What The X-47B Reveals About The Future Of Autonomous Flight

Five things you need to know about the X-47B, the U.S. military's first unmanned, autonomous combat jet.<p>When the Navy's X-47B drone screamed skyward off the aircraft carrier <i>USS George H.W. Bush</i> in May, those of us standing on the flight deck knew we were witnessing history: a robot flying …

Landing on asteroids could cause a zero-gravity avalanche

Asteroids may not be as stable as scientists thought. A recent experiment shows that the force from a landing spacecraft might easily cause an avalanche or something resembling an extraterrestrial mudslide, as a result of shifts in the dust on the asteroid's granular surface.<p>Researchers compare the …

UK astronomers plan to join search for alien intelligence

British astronomers have drawn up plans to scour the heavens for signs of alien life using a network of telescopes that can detect broadcasts from …

The Weird Way Alcohol Behaves In Space

Quantum tunneling holds a clue for one of the great mysteries of space chemistry.<p>A few years back, scientists discovered a giant cloud of hooch floating around in space. The 288 billion-mile cloud of gaseous methanol, an alcohol present in antifreeze and some moonshine presented a conundrum: How do …

APOD: NGC 6384: Spiral Beyond the Stars (2013 Jul 06) Credit: ESA, Hubble, NASA http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130706.html Explanation: The universe is filled with galaxies. But to see them astronomers must look out beyond the stars of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. This colorful Hubble Space Telescopic portrait features spiral galaxy NGC 6384, about 80 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Ophiuchus. At that distance, NGC 6384 spans an estimated 150,000 light-years, while the Hubble close-up of the galaxy's central region is about 70,000 light-years wide. The sharp image shows details in the distant galaxy's blue star clusters and dust lanes along magnificent spiral arms, and a bright core dominated by yellowish starlight. Still, the individual stars seen in the picture are all in the relatively close foreground, well within our own galaxy. The brighter Milky Way stars show noticeable crosses, or diffraction spikes, caused by the telescope itself. http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1108a/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130706 #APOD