Sci Curious

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These birds are choking on a plastic ocean

<b>Midway Atoll (CNN) —</b> Shock, combined with a little wonder at the unnatural. That's how I feel as I watch the knife slice through the sternum of a dead Laysan albatross.<p>Inside its ribcage: a sickening array of plastic.<p>A red bottle top from a well-known soft drink brand. A cigarette lighter. Or two. …

It’s Probably an Appropriate Time to Learn About the Imposter Phenomenon

If you can measure Imposter phenomenon, how does one get rid of it? (Asking for a friend.)<p>The feeling that you don't belong somewhere is common. It can be fleeting, like accidentally boarding a train headed the wrong way. Sometimes, it's less temporary.<p>Perhaps you're the only person of color in …

Japanese scientist wins Nobel for revealing secrets of cellular recycling

The discovery of the molecular mechanisms behind “self eating” or autophagy — a process cells use to break down and recycle parts that are no longer …

The Weak Evidence Behind Brain-Training Games

Seven psychologists reviewed every single scientific paper put forward to support these products—and found them wanting.<p>If you repeat a specific mental task—say, memorizing a string of numbers—you’ll obviously get better at it. But what if your recollection improved more generally? What if, by …

The Brain

Brain Game Claims Fail A Big Scientific Test

Want to be smarter? More focused? Free of memory problems as you age?<p>If so, don't count on brain games to help you.<p>That's the conclusion of an exhaustive evaluation of the scientific literature on brain training games and programs. It was published Monday in the journal <i>Psychological Science in the</i> …

The Brain

FDA Is Redefining The Term 'Healthy' On Food Labels

So, you're looking for a quick grab-and-go snack, and there's a row of energy bars at the checkout counter. Are they a healthy option?<p>The maker of Kind bars thinks so. The company has used the phrase "healthy and tasty" on some of its products that contain lots of nuts. But, here's the issue: The …

FDA

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine Is Awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi

Yoshinori Ohsumi, a Japanese cell biologist, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday for his discoveries on how cells recycle their content, a process known as autophagy, a Greek term for “self-eating.”<p>It is a crucial process. During starvation, cells break down proteins and …

Nobel Prize

The mystery of why left-handers are so much rarer

Relatively few people are lefties, and it’s a puzzle why. Still, the science of handedness is revealing fascinating insights about you – from how it could change the way you think, to the fact that you might be ‘left-eared’.<p>From the time we pick up a chunky crayon and start scribbling as children, …

The Brain

Scientists challenge recommendation that men with more muscle need more protein - Scienmag: Latest Science and Health News

Sports nutrition recommendations may undergo a significant shift after research from the University of Stirling has found individuals with more …

16 fascinating science stories eclipsed by Donald Trump and the Olympics

U.S. presidential election years can feel like lost years for people who are interested in science. And the election-year summer Olympics only make it worse. Science doesn’t operate on four-year cycles — it just marches on, with discoveries, incremental advances, improved techniques, retractions, …

Meet the Trekkie who became a real-life vulcanologist

Ever since she was a young girl watching Star Trek with her parents, Kayla Iacovino dreamed of adventures in science.<p>Now, Dr. Iacovino -- a professional geologist -- treks into the war-torn mountains of Ethiopia and the highly-restricted forests of North Korea. She even spent more than a month on …

The call of the weird: In praise of cryptobiologists

<i>Scientists who search for obscure or supposedly extinct creatures are not getting the respect and recognition they deserve</i><p>LAST December an 8-second …

Nasa to make all its research available free on the Internet

The American space agency, Nasa, is to make all its research available free of charge.<p>It is a move which will delight science enthusiasts and aspiring astronauts.<p>Normally such material is hidden behind a paywall, meaning that it is often out of reach for the lay enthusiast. The EU has also said it …

Climate change will mean the end of national parks as we know them

As the National Parks Service turns 100 this week, we look at how receding ice, extreme heat and acidifying oceans are transforming America’s landscapes, and guardians of national parks face the herculean task of stopping it<p>After a century of shooing away hunters, tending to trails and helping …

Climate Change

Why Are Rio's Olympic Pools Green And Smelly? Ryan Lochte's Hair Holds The Answer

No, no, NO! Hydrogen peroxide does not turn water green (nor does it make water smell like farts)<p>Whenever I read about the 2016 Summer Olympics, water quality has almost always been mentioned as being the biggest concern. And no wonder, considering that an investigative report published by the AP …

Rio Olympics

Earth - Why we have a spine, when over 90% of animals don't

A popular trope of science fiction is a world in which creatures with unusual body plans rule. From the octopoid Martians of <i>War of the Worlds</i> to the giant "bugs" of <i>Starship Troopers</i>, there is a creepy appeal in the idea that a race of spineless creatures could pose a real threat to humanity.<p>Because …

Biology

Cocaine addicts can’t kick other habits either

People hooked on cocaine are more likely to stick to other habits, too. They’re also less sensitive to negative feedback that tends to push …

addicts

Women in sports are often underrepresented in science

On April 19, 1966, Roberta Gibb became the first woman to (unofficially) finish the Boston marathon. Women were officially allowed to enter the race …

Revealed: first mammal species wiped out by human-induced climate change

<b>Exclusive:</b> scientists find no trace of the Bramble Cay melomys, a small rodent that was the only mammal endemic to Great Barrier Reef<p>Human-caused climate change appears to have driven the Great Barrier Reef’s only endemic mammal species into the history books, with the Bramble Cay melomys, a small …

Biodiversity

Fighting big farm pollution with a tiny plant

Fertilizer runoff can fuel the growth of toxic algae nearby lakes. A teen decided to harness a tiny plant to sop up that fertilizer.

A Visual Guide to Antibiotic Resistance

The growing threat of drug resistant bacteria appears fairly frequently in the news, with the latest moment of crisis centered around one patient in …

E.coli

Maximum size of giant squid remains a mystery

Giant squid are the stuff of nightmares. They were even one of the deadly dangers in Jules Verne’s <i>20,000 Leagues Under the Sea</i>, attacking the <i>Nautilus</i> …

Stone Age dog bone sheds new light on possible 'dual origins' of pet dogs

<b>A dog bone found at an Irish Stone Age tomb has helped to shed new light on the possible dual origins of pet dogs.</b><p>The dog bone, believed to date back almost 5,000 years, was unearthed at Newgrange in County Meath - an ancient monument built by Stone Age farmers.<p>Scientists at Trinity College Dublin …

Scientists Say: Yottawatt

<b>Yottawatt</b> (noun, “YOT-ah-wat”)<p>One million billion billion watts. A watt is used to measure the flow of energy that is used, released or converted …

A paper microscope magnifies on the go

<b>NASHVILLE, Tenn.</b> — Classroom microscopes bring the small to life. Recently, inventors developed a microscope made mostly from paper. It’s light, …

A Long Life Is Genetically Different From A Healthy One

How do some people live for nearly a century free of chronic disease? Scientists have identified genetic clues that could explain why.<p>They’ve made it far in life, 80 years and counting. Yet they’re conspicuously free of the afflictions that often crop up in old age: diabetes, heart disease, cancer, …

Sewing circuits: A crafty way to get kids interested in STEM

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — With the use of thread that can conduct electricity, science education specialists have shown that combining electricity lessons …

Adding ‘exercise’ labels on packaging won’t solve the obesity problem. Instead, stick to a simple message: eat three balanced meals a day<p>The Royal Society for Public Health proposed last week in the British Medical Journal that food packaging should display symbols of “activity-equivalent” …

Cats Experience Less Stress When They Have Access To Boxes: Study

Close<p>Why cats and boxes mix has long been a mystery. Now researchers from the University of Utrecht have discovered why, publishing the results of …