Pradhvin Sasidharan

217 Flips | 11 Magazines | 78 Likes | 1 Following | 4 Followers | @PradhvinSas10u6 | Keep up with Pradhvin Sasidharan on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Pradhvin Sasidharan”

Thirty micrometres a minute: scientists discover the speed of death

<b>Name:</b> The speed of death.<p><b>Age:</b> Not sure that is entirely relevant.<p><b>Appearance:</b> Cellular.<p><b>You’re talking in riddles.</b> I’m bracing myself for some seriously hard science.<p><b>Stop beating about the bush and get on with it.</b> OK, here goes. Two Stanford University systems biologists, Xianrui Cheng and James …

Stanford University

The respect deficit

Economic inequality is an urgent problem. Deeper still is our loss of mutual respect, the foundation of a fair society<i>By Richard V Reeves</i>Read at Aeon

Labor Economics

DEFINE_ME

Medical Journals

This 1936 advice manual on living alone is smart, witty, and still helpful today

The greatest advice book ever published was written by Marjorie Hillis, the editor of Voguecirca 1936. It’s called <i>Live Alone and Like It</i>,and it’s addressed to what was then a new social category, emerging in the aftermath of the Great Depression: bachelor ladies, or “the liver-aloners” — women who …

Great Depression

Why Are We Still So Worried About Wat­­ching Porn?

Decades of fearmongering almost got porn addiction added to the International Classification of Diseases. Thankfully, the World Health Organization …

World Health Organization

Fishy Fish Pills

Paul Greenberg’s newest bookexplains why omega-3 supplements may be useless for you and terrible for the environment.<p>A few years ago, for reasons I …

Aquaculture

OPINION: Science denialism is dangerous. But so is science imperialism.

<i>“Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.”</i> – Jeff Goldblum as Ian Malcom in</i> …

Prior object-knowledge sharpens properties of early visual feature-detectors

Article |<p>Open | Published: 18 July 2018<p><i>Scientific Reports</i><b>volume 8</b>, Article number: 10853 (2018) | Download Citation<p>Abstract<p>Early stages of visual …

Neurology

DNA Damage from CRISPR Has Been ‘Seriously Underestimated’

The breakthrough gene therapy has hit some major stumbling blocks in the last few months that threaten its status as a therapy.<p><i>This article is part of</i> DNA/IDK <i>, a semi-regular column exploring how genetic modification is shaping the future.</i> <b>Follow along here</b> <i>.</i><p>When CRISPR was first revealed to the …

Genetics

Improving Ourselves to Death

What the self-help gurus and their critics reveal about our times.<p><i>Audio:</i> Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone.<p>Happy New Year, you! Now that the champagne has gone flat and the Christmas tree is off to be mulched, it’s time to turn your thoughts …

It’s not ‘all in your head’: When other doctors give up on patients, a boundary-breaking neurologist treats them

BOSTON — Even beforehand — before the compulsive writing and the bipolar diagnosis, before the niche medical practice and the best-selling book — Dr. …

Must Science Conflict With Spirituality?

<b>SEARCHING FOR STARS ON AN ISLAND IN MAINE</b><br>By Alan Lightman<br>226 pp. Pantheon Books. $24.95.<p>In 1801, Samuel Taylor Coleridge calculated the impact ratio of scientists to poets like this: “The souls of 500 Sir Isaac Newtons would go to the making up of a Shakespeare or a Milton.” Defending his 1820 poem …

A Sneaky Theory of Where Language Came From

It might have hijacked our early ancestors’ brains.<p>I’m sitting in the sun on one of the first mild days of the spring, talking with a modern-day flintknapper about the origins of human language. His name is Neill Bovaird, and he’s neither an archaeologist nor a linguist, just a 38-year-old bearded …

Linguistics

What Time Feels Like When You’re Improvising - Issue 61: Coordinates

<i>This article is part of</i> Nautilus’ <i>month-long exploration of the science and art of time. Read the introduction here.</i>Don’t look at the clock! Now tell …

How David Bowie Invented Ziggy Stardust

<i>Jason Heller’s book</i> Strange Stars: David Bowie, Pop Music, and the Decade Sci-Fi Exploded <i>is the story of how science fiction influenced the musicians</i> …

The dreams you forget are the most important for learning

Dreaming when we sleep helps us learn new information, and now a study has found that it’s the boring dreams we have during the deepest stages of …

Descartes was wrong: ‘a person is a person through other persons’

According to Ubuntu philosophy, which has its origins in ancient Africa, a newborn baby is not a person. People are born without ‘ena’, or selfhood, …

Selfies

Science Nerds Are Sharing Their Favorite 'Bonkers Science Facts' And They're Seriously Weird And Delightful

We've had scientists sharing the one thing they'd like the world to know about their field because they think it's important or funny.<p>Now scientists …

Why read Aristotle today?

Modern self-help draws heavily on Stoic philosophy. But Aristotle was better at understanding real human happiness<i>By Edith Hall</i>Read at Aeon

Aristotle

How Brain Waves Surf Sound Waves to Process Speech - Facts So Romantic

<i>Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine’s Abstractions blog.</i><i>Decades ago, the noted computational neuroscientist David Marr observed that</i> …

Neuroscience News and Research

How to Combat Heart Disease and Diabetes? Go Keto, says New Study

A new study indicates that when it comes to weight loss and regulating metabolic syndrome diseases like diabetes, a keto diet without exercise is …

Diabetes

What Type of Exercise Is Best for the Brain?

Exercise is just as good for the brain as it is for the body, a growing body of research is showing. And one kind in particular—aerobic …

People crave silence, yet are unnerved by it

<b>A History of Silence.</b> By Alain Corbin. <i>Translated by Jean Birrell. Polity; 147 pages; $19.95 and £14.99.</i><p><b>Get our daily newsletter</b><p>Upgrade your inbox and …

Every Cell in Your Body Has the Same DNA. Except It Doesn’t.

James Priest couldn’t make sense of it. He was examining the DNA of a desperately ill baby, searching for a genetic mutation that threatened to stop her heart. But the results looked as if they had come from two different infants.<p>“I was just flabbergasted,” said Dr. Priest, a pediatric cardiologist …

Is philosophy absurd? Only when you’re doing it right

Last semester, halfway through a meeting of my ‘Meaning of Life’ seminar, I found myself lying on a window seat along the eastern wall of the …

A Revealer of Secrets in the Data of Life and the Universe

The statistician Donald Richards lives to uncover subtle patterns hiding in real-world data.

Universe

Mental health self-help guides tend to be dull, so I created a vibrant zine | Andy Walton

I’ve used my experiences over the last 20 years to develop Swirl, an accessible guide to managing anxiety<p>I have struggled with anxiety, particularly overthinking, for a number of years. I’ve had cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and taken medication – and I’ve collected a lot of self-help …

The myth of ‘mad’ genius

The Romantic stereotype that creativity is enhanced by a mood disorder is dangerous, and dissolves under careful scrutiny<i>By Christa L Taylor</i>Read at …

Yale Presents a Free Online Course on Literary Theory, Covering Structuralism, Deconstruction & More

It’s been a hallmark of the culture wars in the last few decades for politicians and opinionators to rail against academia. Professors of humanities …