Peter White

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Nigel Barker Explains Why Retouching Isn't a Bad Thing

Screenshot taken from the video<p>Nigel Barker is an extremely well known portrait and commercial photographer and he recently gave a bit of a rant on …

How to Use Lightroom Brushes to Contour Faces

It's amazing how adding just a little bit of shadows can drastically improve the depth of your photographs. Contouring faces is a little trick that …

Tutorials

10 best email apps for Android

Email is one of the oldest and most important forms of online communication. It’s a service many of us use every single day. There are tons of email services and email apps that accompany them. Some may only have a single account on something like Gmail, Outlook, or Yahoo. Their individual apps …

Apps

A Super Simple Way to Make Landscape Photos POP Using Lightroom

It seems like virtually all outdoor or landscape photographs suffer from the same illness when they come out of the camera. The symptoms are: An …

APOD: Molecular Cloud Barnard 68 (2014 Dec 14) Image Credit: FORS Team, 8.2-meter VLT Antu, ESO http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap141214.html Explanation: Where did all the stars go? What used to be considered a hole in the sky is now known to astronomers as a dark molecular cloud. Here, a high concentration of dust and molecular gas absorb practically all the visible light emitted from background stars. The eerily dark surroundings help make the interiors of molecular clouds some of the coldest and most isolated places in the universe. One of the most notable of these dark absorption nebulae is a cloud toward the constellation Ophiuchus known as Barnard 68, pictured above. That no stars are visible in the center indicates that Barnard 68 is relatively nearby, with measurements placing it about 500 light-years away and half a light-year across. It is not known exactly how molecular clouds like Barnard 68 form, but it is known that these clouds are themselves likely places for new stars to form. In fact, Barnard 68 itself has been found likely to collapse and form a new star system. It is possible to look right through the cloud in infrared light. http://www.eso.org/sci/facilities/paranal/instruments/fors.html http://www.eso.org/projects/vlt/ http://www.eso.org/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=141214 #APOD