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John Wilkes Booth - a summary

Even before he became famous as the first man to assassinate a United States president, John Wilkes Booth was a well-known name. Born into one of the …

SHAVE AND A HAIRCUT- 

<b>SHAVE AND A HAIRCUT-</b><p><b>“This is a casual view of Union Army camp life,” During free moments, the men would clean up and be shaved.</b><p><b>CA. 1862, BY THOMAS C. ROCHE, PUBLISHED BY ANTHONY & CO. ROBIN STANFORD COLLECTION</b><p>The hair of the men in the Civil War was a major change in tactical warfare from the previous worldwide wars. For example, the wars in Europe prior to the American Civil War were fought with long hair, and in fact long hair was a valuable trait sought after in solders primarily for two …

Science Fiction And The American Civil War 

<b>Science Fiction And The American Civil War</b><p><b>“Love”, The Low-Budget, Art House Feature Film Produced By Los Angeles Supergroup Angels & Airwaves.</b><p>In 2039 Captain Lee Miller is an astronaut who finds himself stranded on the International Space Station without any communication with Earth nor any understanding of the world ending events that took place. He remains alone for six years, goes crazy in the absence of human interaction and starts hearing voices and interacting with figments of his …

Mixing Science Fiction With The Civil War-

<b>Mixing Science Fiction With The Civil War-</b><p><b>“Love” A Film From (2011)</b><p><b>During an 1864 battle of the American Civil War, a lone Union</b> <b>soldier, Captain Lee Briggs (Bradley Horne), is dispatched on a mission to investigate a mysterious object reported to Union forces.</b><p>175 years later, in the year 2039, United States Astronaut Lee Miller (Gunner Wright) is sent to the International Space Station as a one-man skeleton crew to examine if it is safe for use and to perform necessary modifications after it …

Peanuts- The Legumes of War: How Peanuts Fed the Confederacy

<b>Peanuts- The Legumes of War: How Peanuts Fed the Confederacy</b><p>Before the Civil War, peanuts were not a widely cultivated crop in the United States—Virginia and North Carolina were the principal producers—and were generally viewed as a foodstuff fit for the lowest social classes and for livestock. When they were consumed, they were usually eaten raw, boiled or roasted, although a few cookbooks suggested ways to make dessert items with them. The goober pea’s status in the Southern diet changed …

The Straight Dope: Drug Addiction In The Civil War-“The Army Disease”

<b>The Straight Dope: Drug Addiction In The Civil War-</b><b>“The Army Disease”</b><p>Drug addiction in the English-speaking world was rare at the beginning of the 19th century but common at the end of it, at least in the United States. By conservative estimate the U.S. had 200,000 addicts in 1900, with most of the increase occurring in the late 1800s. The Civil War is often blamed for this–after the war it’s said morphine addiction was widely known as “the army disease.”<p>Some historians think the war’s …

OPIUM IN THE CIVIL WAR-

<b>OPIUM IN THE CIVIL WAR-</b><p><b>Laudanum Addiction- Late 19th Century Addicts Were Disproportionately Upper-Class Southern, White And Female</b><p>By the beginning of the civil war, there was probably some opium of some form in most household medicine cabinets. In The Plantation Mistress, a 1982 study of women’s life in the antebellum south, author Catherine Clinton writes that she found home remedies, all containing opium, for many common illnesses. She observes, “Laudanum was commonly used throughout the …

19th Century Morphine Syringe 

<b>19th Century Morphine Syringe</b><p>Morphine was isolated from opium in 1803 by Frederick Wilhelm Adam Serturner in Germany, who called his creation ‘morphium’, which was later shortened to morphine. Morphine was only about one-tenth the weight of raw opium but it was ten times stronger.<p>Morphine first became available in the United States in the 1830s but its popularity surged several decades later. The drug was frequently used to treat wounded soldiers in the Civil War and some developed a lifelong …

In 1861, the Army of Virginia published “Directions for Cooking by Troops in Camp and Hospital"

<b>In 1861, the Army of Virginia published “Directions for Cooking by Troops in Camp and Hospital"</b><p>An Army camp cooking manual, the content of which was written by Florence Nightingale. The recipes emphasized meat and milk (for protein) and whole grains, fruits and vegetables (for carbohydrates). The first “US Family Food Guide (1916)” was published 35 years later, with essentially similar recommendations.<p>Civil War historian William C. Davis, in <i>A Taste for War: The Culinary History of the Blue and</i> …

“He’s as drunk as Cooter Brown.”

<b>“He’s as drunk as Cooter Brown.”</b><p>Cooter Brown is an infamous character in Southern lore. Legend tells that he lived on the Mason-Dixon line — the border between the North and South — during the Civil War. To avoid the draft on either side, Cooter decided to stay drunk throughout the entire war, making him ineligible for battle. Ever since, colloquial and proverbial ratings of drunkenness have been benchmarked against the legendary drinker: “as drunk as Cooter Brown” or “drunker than Cooter …

Approximately 620,000 soldiers died from bullets or disease in the Civil War

<b>Approximately 620,000 soldiers died from bullets or disease in the Civil War. We can never know the number of women who died of broken hearts.</b><p>Two love letters from “Sallie” (who also calls herself “Birdie”) to an unidentified Confederate Army major. Her January 5, 1865 letter expresses love for him (“Do you not believe I love you, or I would never have overleaped the bounds of conventionality and addressed you first”) but by January 19 she complains, “Why don’t you write to me? Why don’t you …