The New Yorker

11 Magazines | 51,325 Followers | @NewYorker | The New Yorker is an award-winning magazine and Web site that offers a signature mix of reporting and commentary, along with humor, fiction, poetry, and cartoons. newyorker.com

Excerpts from Steinbeck’s Novel About the 2013–17 California Drought

“This drought emergency is over. But the next drought could be around the corner. Conservation must remain a way of life.” —California Governor Jerry Brown<p>When 2015 was half gone, and the sun climbed high above the 405 and stayed, an In-N-Out wrapper blew down the highway like a tumbleweed, and a …

California Drought

The Last Queen of Greenwich Village

The wedding of Joseph Touchette, better known as Tish, was typical for New England in the years after the Second World War. A minister officiated; a hot buffet was served; a friend provided an apartment in Providence, Rhode Island, for the honeymoon. What was unusual was that Tish was the bride. …

Greenwich Village

What Amazon’s Purchase of Whole Foods Really Means

Last week, two days before announcing that it would be acquiring Whole Foods, Amazon released a short promotional video for a new product called the Dash Wand. The Wand is a candy-bar-size gizmo that costs twenty dollars. It sticks to your refrigerator with magnets and lets you order products by …

Amazon

Weekly Culture Review: “GLOW,” Prodigy, “Transformers,” and More

<i>Sign up for our newsletter to have the Culture Review delivered to your inbox each week.</i><p>This week, the great Queens rapper Prodigy died. He was forty-two. Though he published an excellent autobiography, a novella, and a cookbook, he hailed from a time when rappers considered their primary …

Movies

The Forgotten Men of Mudville

What to Stream This Weekend: Five Films for Summertime

<i>Each week, Richard Brody picks a classic film, a modern film, an independent film, a foreign film, and a documentary for online viewing.</i><p>One of the greatest films about modern selfhood, about partnership and independence—Paul Mazursky’s “<b>An Unmarried Woman</b>,” from 1978, which is currently on Netflix, …

Manhattan

The Whispered Warnings of Radiohead’s “OK Computer” Have Come True

I’ve noticed a nugget of embarrassment buried in the recent avalanche of critical reappraisals and retroactive interrogations of Radiohead’s “OK Computer,” a record that was released in 1997 and is celebrating its twentieth anniversary this summer. Critics (and some fans) approached its …

Music

After Travis Kalanick’s Resignation, Will Uber Really Change?

On Tuesday evening, Travis Kalanick, a co-founder of Uber, resigned from his post as chief executive, apparently under intense pressure from the company’s major shareholders. Kalanick, whose public persona has been variously characterized as aggressive, juvenile, and brash, is both reviled and …

Travis Kalanick

“The Beguiled”: Sofia Coppola’s Dubiously Abstract Vision of the Civil War

The action in Sofia Coppola’s new film, “The Beguiled,” takes place in 1864, in Virginia, during the Civil War. It’s set in motion when a young girl—Amelia, or Amy, Dabney (Oona Laurence)—picking mushrooms in the woods finds a Union soldier, Corporal John McBurney (Colin Farrell), hiding in the …

Sofia Coppola

Episode 88: Ai Weiwei, and Doing Business with China

Donald Trump’s policy of “America First” gives a rising China more room to flex its muscles. This week, we consider from many sides the complex relationship between the U.S. and China. David Remnick talks with Ai Weiwei, the dissident and global art star; a congressman asks us to reconsider trade …

China

The Dubious Counting at the Center of the G.O.P.’s Health-Care Reform

After Mitch McConnell, the Senate Majority Leader, released a draft of the Senate health-care bill, on Thursday morning, the media finally began focussing on the essence of what Republicans are proposing: an enormous redistribution of wealth into the pockets of the already-wealthy. The bill would …

Health Care

A Virginia Town Responds to a Murder—Hate Crime or Not

Mohmoud Hassanen, the father of the seventeen-year-old Northern Virginia high-school student who was murdered near her mosque early on Sunday morning, appeared before the cameras for the first time at a press conference on Tuesday night, looking haggard and stupefied. The police had already …

Crime

The Skateboarding Legend Brian Anderson Comes Out

Brian Anderson first made his name in skateboarding in the mid-nineties, with a breakout part in “Welcome to Hell,” a video released by the skateboard company Toy Machine. Not long afterward, he was named Skater of the Year by the magazine <i>Thrasher</i>. The lithe yet powerful Anderson assailed large …

The Indomitable Humanism of Darius Milhaud

Darius Milhaud (1892-1974), the great but excessively prolific French composer, wrote hundreds of works, many of which you don’t need to know about. One of the exceptions, however, is the opera “La Mère Coupable” (“The Guilty Mother,” 1965), which the intrepid and amazingly energetic “indie” …

Daily Cartoon: Friday, June 23rd

Cartoons

Job Opening: Wedding Planner/Housing Administrator

The New York City councilman Ritchie Torres, who chairs the council’s Committee on Public Housing, had never heard of Lynne Patton before last week, when Greg B. Smith, a reporter for the <i>Daily News</i>, called him to ask what he thought about Patton’s new role in the federal government. When Smith’s …

Wedding Planning

Is ISIS Conceding Defeat?

Three years ago, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi chose the Great Mosque of al-Nuri, in Mosul, as the site to proclaim his new Islamic State. The mosque, known as al-Hadba, or the “hunchback,” for its leaning minaret, is a fabled landmark in the Middle East. It dates back to the twelfth century. The creation …

Islamic State (ISIS)

Headspace Special Meditation Session

Welcome back to another Headspace session. This is a special session because it is exclusively geared toward you, Stephen Bradley. The name of this lesson is Your Payment Was Declined, Stephen.<p>As always, make sure to find a comfortable spot in which to do this exercise. A nice chair, or even the …

Meditation

Jane Jacobs, Georgia O’Keeffe, and the Power of the Marimekko Dress

On June 20, 1966, Jane Jacobs was speaking out against the destruction of Washington Square Park. “SOS, Park Association of New York City Opposes N.Y.U. Library!” reads the sign taped to the table. And another: “N.Y.U. Don’t block off the … ” The signs overlap. The light? The street? The park? All …

Jane Jacobs

Gary Panter’s “Songy of Paradise”

Gary Panter, a prolific cartoonist who emerged in the eighties as the leading proponent of punk comics, has long been interested in blending mystical fantasy and literature to create wryly irreverent comics. For over a decade, Panter transmuted each line of Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy into two …

Bible

Bling Ring

Netflix’s “<i>GLOW</i>,” created by Carly Mensch and Liz Flahive, and executive-produced by Jenji Kohan, of “Orange Is the New Black,” is a carbonated blast, ten episodes of pure Silly String joy. It’s smartly plotted, with characters that deepen in the course of the show. But, refreshingly, in our era of …

TV

The Grill

The supreme fiction of the old Four Seasons restaurant was that it would last forever—that this vessel of modernism, encased in walnut and Carrara marble, would sail into the mists of time and emerge unchanged in hundreds of years, businessmen still grinning behind brazenly pink skyscrapers of …

Four Seasons

Departures and Arrivals

In May, on the final day of the Metropolitan Opera season, the gelato-voiced soprano Renée Fleming sang what might have been her farewell performance in a major repertory role. Fleming, who is a youthful fifty-eight, has denied reports that she is retiring from the operatic stage, and she may …

Met

Mike Myers’s Strange Resurfacing on “The Gong Show”

If you weren’t around for it at the time, as I was not, you can watch the original “Gong Show,” the amateur un-talent show that ran on NBC and then in syndication from 1976 to 1980, on YouTube. It is an impossibly, almost magically, weird television program. Its weirdness began with its host and …

TV

Prodigy’s Effortless Swagger

On Tuesday, the Queens-raised rapper and producer Prodigy died, at the age of forty-two. The cause of his death has not been revealed, but Prodigy, who was born Albert Johnson, spent his life battling sickle-cell anemia. For many rap fans, the albums that he and his musical partner, Havoc, made in …

Music

Old Questions But No New Answers in the Philando Castile Verdict

The cycle of lethal police violence, community outrage, and legal proceedings that yield no consequences came around again last Friday in St. Paul, Minnesota. A jury acquitted a police officer, Jeronimo Yanez, of all three charges—one count of second-degree manslaughter and two counts of dangerous …

Philando Castile

Brexit Blues

The Conservative Party’s failure to gain a parliamentary majority in the U.K. general election earlier this month has been seen as a repudiation of Prime Minister Theresa May and her plan for the British withdrawal from the European Union. Sam Knight joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how England …

Populism

Choose Your Own Advertising Experience

Alternative Fuel

Saudi Arabia’s Game of Thrones

In the fractious world of Middle Eastern politics, Mohammed bin Salman is seen either as a long-awaited young reformer shaking up the world’s most autocratic society, or as an impetuous and inexperienced princeling whose rapid rise to power could destabilize Saudi Arabia, the preëminent sheikhdom …

Middle East

What the Republicans’ Senate Health-Care Bill Means for America

<i>On Thursday, Senate Republicans unveiled their bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. Below, New Yorker writers offer some initial reactions to the news.</i><p>The Senate bill is really three separate proposals. In the private-insurance market, it amounts to what Larry Levitt, a health-care expert at …

ObamaCare