National Geographic

6 Magazines | 5.9M Followers | @NationalGeographic | Inspiring perspectives on the planet.

See Japan's Surprising Sand Dunes

Escape the big city lights and get lost in this spectacular desertscape.<p>Stretched along the Sea of Japan just outside the city of Tottori is an unexpected swath of gold: Japan’s only sand dunes. Unlike classic images of Japan—sushi, bullet trains, Shibuya Crossing, and Hello Kitty—Tottori is more …

Japan

Half of All Species Are on the Move—And We're Feeling It

As climate change displaces everything from moose to microbes, it’s affecting human foods, businesses, and diseases.<p>The shrubs probably responded first. In the 19th century, alder and flowering willows in the Alaskan Arctic stood no taller than a small child—just a little over three feet. But as …

Climate Change

Humans in California 130,000 Years Ago? Get the Facts

A new study has dropped a bombshell on archaeology, claiming signs of human activity in the Americas far earlier than thought.<p>In an announcement sure to spark a firestorm of controversy, researchers say they’ve found signs of ancient humans in California between 120,000 and 140,000 years ago—more …

Anthropology

What You Need to Know About Trump’s National Monument Rethink

Trump questions presidential authority to “lock up land”—but can he really rescind federal monuments?<p>Utah has 13 national parks and monuments, most set in spectacular red-rock formations that make it the envy of tourist bureaus everywhere. But the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration, Utah’s four …

National Parks

This Nature Reserve Boasts Natural Beauty—and a Monkey Circus?

At Vietnam’s Can Gio reserve, a place where wildlife is supposed to be protected, monkeys are forced to jump over flames, walk tightropes, and ride bicycles.<p>Watch: Monkeys Forced to Perform at Nature Reserve<p>The animal welfare group Animals Asia has released this footage showing macaques riding …

Wildlife

15 Iconic Adventures Worth the Effort

These world wonders are worth the trek.<p>When asked why he wanted to climb Mount Everest, English mountaineer George Mallory famously replied, “Because it’s there.” For those of us who need a little more motivation, we’ve chosen 15 celebrated places—including Machu Picchu, Pisa, and Provence—worth …

List-Worthy

Paddling With a Passport From the U.S. to Mexico

Big Bend National Park and Mexico’s Boquillas del Carmen have a symbiotic relationship that facilitates exchange across borders, especially visitors. But is that all going to change?<p>Santa Elena Canyon’s walls are 1,500 feet of river-smooth limestone, high and close enough to give you tunnel vision. …

National Parks

Whistling Caterpillars And 5 More Surprisingly Musical Species

The shrill sound has many purposes in nature, from deterring predators to deepening bonds.<p>Some people can't whistle at all, much less whistle without lips.<p>The walnut sphinx caterpillar has no such trouble. When disturbed, say by a predator, these North American insects compress their bodies and …

Biological Species

How Social Media Saved One of the World’s Last Sumatran Rhinos

The female rhino Puntung was treated for an injury in a daring mission.<p>Millions of people around the world rely on social media platforms like Twitter to receive minute-to-minute updates on news breaking globally. It isn’t every day though that a single tweet can cause a domino effect that led to …

Extinction

Get an Amazing Whale's-Eye View Underneath Antarctica

Cameras attached to humpback whales are giving researchers fresh insight into a rapidly changing Southern Ocean.<p>Watch: Stunning Footage From The Backs of Whales<p>To see the world through the eyes of a 40-ton polar whale it helps to use a little bug. At least that's what this satellite tracking tag …

Oceans

Artificial Womb Could Offer New Hope for Premature Babies

A device tested on lambs could one day help extremely tiny babies grow up healthy.<p>Marking what could be a vital development for treating premature babies, researchers announced today that eight fetal lambs survived and grew inside an artificial womb for four weeks, the longest an animal has done so.<p>…

Pregnancy

This Bug Can Eat Plastic. But Can It Clean Up Our Mess?

Scientists have discovered that wax worms can eat plastic bags. Could that help us reduce plastic pollution?<p>Each year, the world produces 300 million tons of plastic, much of which resists degradation and ends up polluting every corner of the globe. But a team of European scientists may have found …

Recycling

Intimate Details of Dolphin Sex Revealed

The study—one of the first of its kind in more than a century—sheds light on how mammals evolved to reproduce in water.<p>Thanks to a pressurized penis inflator and genitals flown in from across the U.S., an anatomist has answered a long sought-after question: how do the genitals of dolphins and …

Biology

Inside the Bizarre Life of the Star-Nosed Mole, World's Fastest Eater

Thirty years of research has revealed just how strange the underground animal with the odd nose really is.<p>A star-nosed mole is surely one of the world's weirdest-looking animals. If you were to come face to face with one, you might think its head had been replaced by a tiny octopus.<p>And for an …

Nature

How Creativity Drives Human Evolution

What's distinctive about humans is that we can imagine something and then make it real.<p>What makes us human? Is war an inevitable part of the human condition? These are some of the questions that anthropologist Augustín Fuentes explores in his new book, <i>The Creative Spark: How Imagination Made Humans</i> …

Creativity

Watch This Huge Tarantula Wriggle Out of Its Skin

Snakes, spiders, and other creatures regularly shed their skins—here's why.<p>Watch a Giant Spider Wriggle Out of Its Skin<p>Spiders freak people out just by existing, but they also have a quality some might consider creepy: They shed their skins.<p>Regular skin peels are routine for other creatures, too, …

Nature

7 Brilliant Inventions That Changed How We Travel

Discover the surprising histories behind the every day objects that transformed travel forever.<p>Many staples of modern journeys have storied histories. Whether commissioned from the U.S. Department of Defense or Steve Jobs’s brain trust, they’ve enabled the mass migration of people around the globe, …

Business Travel

Why a 'War on Science' Puts Us All at Risk

A scientist talks budget cuts, vanishing curiousity, Florida real estate, and similarities in the politics of gay marriage and climate change.<p>David Titley is a rare blend of two opposing personality types. He is a scientist and skilled navigator of Washington politics. That makes him one of the …

Climate Change

Secret Room Holds 'Lost' Michelangelo Artwork

Florence, Italy<p>These rarely seen drawings on the chamber walls may have been created when the famed artist took refuge from the Medici family in 1530.<p>In 1975, Paolo Dal Poggetto, then director of the Medici Chapels museum in Florence, stumbled upon a Renaissance treasure.<p>While searching for a new …

Art History

Thank NASA for Baby Formula—And 6 More Government-Funded Inventions

A host of popular products probably wouldn’t be around today if not for robust national investment in science and innovation.<p>Do you use baby formula? Then you owe thanks to NASA. Did you look up today's forecast on your weather app? Be grateful to the National Science Foundation, the National …

Science

15 Mesmerizing Travel Photos to Inspire You

See how to be the 2017 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year.<p>Thousands of photographs stand up to the judges of the annual National Geographic Photographer of the Year Contest. Covering nature, cities, and people, some entries surprise or astonish. All images transport us to the far …

Photography

Invest Now to Nourish the Cities of Tomorrow

Rising urban populations require a commitment to food and agriculture research.<p><i>By Philip Pardey</i><p>We are living in the midst of an unparalleled human migration from the farm to the city, one that is so massive, it may be hard to see.<p>Today, about half of the world’s 7.4 billion people are estimated to …

Agriculture

These Monks Saved Their Abbey by Protecting the Earth

Catholic monks in Virginia have reinvigorated their order by vowing to be sustainable.<p>BERRYVILLE, VA – A tiny community of cloistered monks in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley had two big problems: one theological and the other ecological.<p>First, the order of Trappist monks had dwindled to ten, from a …

Buddhism

10 Badass Travelers Throughout History

These trailblazers staged epic journeys across new lands, broke cultural barriers, and revealed the radical diversity of the world around us.<p><#doc> </#doc>

Travel

Dog's Death Spotlights Use of Cyanide 'Bombs' to Kill Predators

One of the weapons the U.S. government uses to poison predators killed a pet Labrador in Idaho, sparking new calls to ban the devices.<p>Fourteen-year-old Canyon Mansfield was out walking the family Labrador, Casey, on public land in the outskirts of Pocatello, Idaho, last month. As they roamed a hill …

Wildlife

One Man’s Plan to Transform a Major City Into a National Park

An ambitious project highlights the importance of urban nature.<p>What is a park? For most of us, a park is a place apart—a reserve of nature in a world increasingly dominated by human activities and arranged to fulfill human needs and desires. But a park is also for people— a place of refuge for the …

National Parks

Earth May Be Best Yet for Finding Signs of Life

The potentially habitable world is close enough that existing telescopes could look for an atmosphere and sniff for traces of extraterrestrials.<p>Astronomers have found a temperate planet a bit bigger and bulkier than Earth orbiting a small star just 40 light-years away. The newly announced world …

Exoplanets

Antarctica Is Covered With More Meltwater Than Thought

While the implications for sea level rise are unclear, a new survey should help scientists better understand climate effects on the continent.<p>A surprisingly vast network of waterways cuts across Antarctica’s ice shelves, the floating tongues of ice emanating from the continent’s coastlines.<p>These …

Global Warming

Discovery May Help Decipher Ancient Inca String Code

New clues to an old mystery about Inca writing aren't etched in stone. They're tied in knots.<p>A discovery made in a remote mountain village high in the Peruvian Andes suggests that the ancient Inca used accounting devices made of knotted, colored strings for more than accounting.<p>The devices, called …

Ancient History

Why Man-Eating Lions Prey on People—New Evidence

An analysis of the notorious Tsavo man-eating lions' teeth has revealed some surprises.<p><i>"I have a very vivid recollection of one particular night when the brutes seized a man from the railway station and brought him close to my camp to devour. I could plainly hear them crunching the bones, and the</i> …

Wildlife