National Geographic

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Botswana “Prevailing” in Struggle Against Weeds Threatening Okavango

Three decades after the first reports of the arrival in Botswana of <i>Salvinia molesta–</i>a free-floating, mat-forming water fern native to Brazil– scientists from the southern African country’s Department of Water Affairs say they are at last prevailing in the struggle against a weed that has come to …

Botswana

Cause for Hope: Ocean Inspiration from the World Heritage community

As I reported Saturday, the managers of the world’s most beloved ocean places are meeting in the Galapagos this week to chart a path forward for Marine World Heritage. Each time we bring this global network together, I am filled with hope. National Geographic readers are well aware of the …

Oceans

Saving the Reef: Lionfish in Florida

<i>Lionfish, a brightly-colored, spiny fish that are not native to Florida, are taking over our reefs. How can we fight off this alien invasion? Floridians have come together to fight them off and save the reef.</i><p>Lionfish look like the red and white Las Vegas showgirls of the sea. Chances are, you’ve …

American South

Reprogramming Memory May Reduce Life-Long Fear of Spiders

Researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden have shown how the effect of exposure therapy can be improved by disrupting the recreation of fear-memories in people with arachnophobia (the extreme fear or loathing of spiders), according to their study published in the research journal <i>Current …

Spiders

How Lobsters eat Jellyfish Without Harm From Venomous Stingers

<b>Hiroshima University</b> scientists examined lobster feces to discover that the crustaceans surround their servings of jellyfish in protective membranes that prevent the stingers from injecting their venom. The results inform aquaculture efforts to sustainably farm lobsters, the university said in a …

Invertebrates

Rainbows Reveal What’s Really Going on in the Sky, Researchers Say

<b>Scientific understanding of rainbows finds many practical applications of their interaction between light, liquid and gas</b><p>Scientists can look at a rainbow and see a lot more than a pretty band of color in a stormy sky. “Knowledge gained from studying these multicoloured arcs of scattered light can …

Science

Sunflowers Track the Sun, Like Solar Panels

<b>Sunflowers use their internal circadian “clocks,” acting on growth hormones, to follow the sun during the day as they grow, say plant biologists at the University of California, Davis.</b><p>“It’s the first example of a plant’s clock modulating growth in a natural environment, and having real …

Sunflowers

Humans Projected to Number Ten Billion by 2050s, Half of us Living in Asia

<b>The world population will reach 9.9 billion in 2050, up 33 percent from an estimated 7.4 billion now, according to projections included in the latest World Population Data Sheet from the Population Reference Bureau (PRB).</b><p>The world population would hit the 10 billion mark in 2053 if the assumptions …

Statistics

Is De-Extinction a Good Idea? Scientists Offer Guidelines to Avoid “Eco-Zombies”

Conservation ecologist Douglas McCauley and University of California-Santa Barbara colleagues lay out a set of guidelines for how de-extinction can be made more ecologically responsible<p>It’s only a matter of time before the woolly mammoth can be brought back from the dead, according to their news …

Science

Experts Meeting in Galápagos Brainstorm Protection of Earth’s Marine Heritage

<b>Managers of the world’s flagship marine protected areas are meeting in the Galápagos Islands this week to chart a sustainable ocean future</b><p><b>National Geographic Endeavour —</b> Today in the Galápagos, UNESCO is bringing together the guardians of our planet’s most unique and beloved ocean places. Our goal: …

Marine biology

Large Wildlife and the Global Carbon Cycle: Studies at the Mpala Research Center

The exact nature of the relationship between large, charismatic wildlife species and the comparatively invisible carbon compounds that cycle around an ecosystem is not abundantly clear. As far as ecosystem carbon goes, it’s understood that the tiny microorganisms in soil do a lot of work, breaking …

Ecology

Planning for Change in One of the Most Intact Places on Earth

Looking out of the window of the small charter plane, en route to Neskantaga First Nation some 480 kilometers northeast of my home in Thunder Bay, I am struck (again) by the sheer size of Ontario’s Far North. Stretched out below me like a massive green and blue tapestry of forest and water, this …

Conservation

Conservationists Call on Japan to ban all Trade in Ivory

My organization, WildlifeDirect, re<b>c</b>ently became aware of the scale of laundering of illegal <b></b>ivory in the ivory markets of Japan through its contact with the Japanese NGO Tears of the African Elephant. Please see more about the interview we did on NTV Wild via this link: …

Japan

Book saves bird’s life: The story of Albie the Albatross

Co-authored by Erica Cirino<p>About a year and a half ago, Melissa Ursey was riding in the car as her husband Jerry drove across the Southern California desert back to their home in Rancho Mirage from their friends’ house in Desert Springs. As the car cruised through the town of Palm Desert, Jerry …

Albatross

Study: Glacial Lakes Appearing in Antarctica

Antarctica is home to Earth’s largest ice mass, which unlike the Arctic remains frozen year round. But a new satellite-based study in the journal <i>Geophysical Research Letters</i> shows that atop the coastal Langhovde Glacier in East Antarctica’s Dronning Maud Land, large numbers of meltwater lakes have …

Environment

NPS Centennial: Celebrating Conservation Worldwide

<i>This article is brought to you by the</i> <i>International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP)</i><i>. Read our</i> <i>other articles</i> <i>on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world.</i><p>Today marks the centennial anniversary of the founding of the …

Conservation

National Parks on Bucket List for 4 out of 5 Americans This Year

Happy Birthday U.S. National Park Service! Americans are heading to the National Parks in record numbers in recognition of the Park Service’s 100th anniversary today, August 25, according to AAA, the largest motoring and leisure travel organization in the country.<p>“Visitation to the national parks …

U.S. Travel

When Poverty and Marine Conservation Are Linked, Start a Responsible Fishing Movement

<i>The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing</i> …

Fishing

Diving Deep Below Arctic Ice to Bring Back Our Ocean’s Skeletons: #bestjobever

<b>Posted by Sharon Pieczenik</b><p>Polar expeditions to explore the ocean are not for the faint of heart. Above the water’s surface, you better be on alert for polar bears. Below, you better be game for diving 60 feet under sea ice into freezing temperatures. Watch National Geographic grantee Branwen …

Algae

Citizen scientists give NPS 100,000+ biodiversity records for 100th birthday

Today, the U.S. National Park Service turns 100 years old. The National Park Service has been celebrating all year by organizing over 100 BioBlitzes to document the species living in our national parks, recreation areas, monuments, and historic sites. In addition to the BioBlitzes, NPS has been …

Biodiversity

Transforming Conservation in China with ‘Land Trust Reserves’

<i>By Charles Bedford, The Nature Conservancy’s Regional Managing Director, Asia Pacific Region, and Dr. Jin Tong, The Nature Conservancy’s Science Director, China Program</i><p>In 2012 in China, the 27,325-acre Laohegou Land Trust Reserve, was designed to link several existing reserves in Sichuan’s Pingwu …

Asia

A Market-Based Strategy for Sustainable Water Management

By Brian Richter, Chief Scientist, Water, The Nature Conservancy<p>Australia is one of the driest inhabited places on Earth. Yet nearly two-thirds of the country’s land area is devoted to agriculture, generating 93 percent of the domestic food supply. The country is only able to sustain this level of …

Sustainability

Frank Ocean Versus the Actual Ocean

It’s nice that Frank Ocean just released his long-anticipated new album, ‘Blond’, that some say is truly awesome. But the fact that his name linked to 12 of 20 articles on Google’s News search under the word ‘ocean’ on Sunday and on Monday had proportionately grown to 6 out of 9 ‘ocean’ news …

Frank Ocean

A week to Change: Phoenix Zoo and Jane Goodall Institute Join Forces to Improve Animal Welfare Around the World

<i>In 2012, in partnership with the Jane Goodall Institute, the Phoenix Zoo created a unique position to promote international animal welfare. Filled by Hilda Tresz, the Behavioral Enrichment and International Animal Welfare Coordinator role is responsible for developing and overseeing the Zoo’s</i> …

Women in Science

Involving Communities in the Fight Against Wildlife Crime

Conservationists are not crying wolf – there really is a global wildlife crisis – and many animals will disappear from their natural habitats within our lifetimes.<p>Occasionally wildlife issues wrest the headlines from other crises and there are a few fleeting moments in the lime-light to make the …

Wildlife

Sharing Kenya’s Wilderness With Underprivileged City Children Uplifts, Inspires Everyone

World Elephant Day celebration in Samburu National Reserve with 91 children from Kenya’s poor neighbourhoods, slums and rural areas was probably the most moving experience of my life.<p>The children experienced a real safari, in a four-wheel-drive vehicle. They camped for the first time in their …

Wildlife

Young Micronesians Explore Nan Madol: A New UNESCO World Heritage Site Located In Their Backyard.

Last month, UNESCO officially announced 21 new additions to the World Heritage Sites list. One of these — located on the Micronesian island of Pohnpei — is the ruins of Nan Madol. Once an ancient city and capital of the Saudeleur Dynasty, Nan Madol is comprised of giant megalithic structures that …

Micronesia

1,075-Year-Old Pine Named ‘Adonis’ Is Europe’s Oldest-Known Living Tree

A Bosnian pine (<i>Pinus heldreichii</i>) growing in the highlands of northern Greece has been dendrocronologically dated to be more than 1,075 years old, says a team of scientists from scientists from Stockholm University (Sweden), the University of Mainz (Germany) and the University of Arizona (USA). …

Europe

Stanford scientists combine satellite data and machine learning to map poverty

Researchers correctly identified impoverished areas across five African countries by using machine learning to extract information from high-resolution satellite imagery, Stanford University’s School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences say in a news statement.<p>“One of the biggest challenges …

Machine Learning

Same-sex Pairing may Give Male Termites an Evolutionary Advantage, Japanese Researchers Suggest

Male Japanese termites form homosexual couples when no females are around — and when the chance arises, they take over a heterosexual couple’s nest and kill the male so that one of them can mate with the now spouseless female, scientists from Kyoto University reported in a study published this week …

Invertebrates