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oPhone: Because Nothing Says 'Thinking of You' More Than a Personalized Scent to Go with That Picture of Your Breakfast

As if we don't have enough meal sharing on social media as it is. It seems that you can't go more than five seconds on Instagram without scrolling …

Social Media

Human sensory reception

<b>Human sensory reception</b>, means by which humans react to changes in external and internal environments.<p>Ancient philosophers called the human senses …

In schizophrenia, gene mutations disrupt key proteins

Genetic mutations seen in people with schizophrenia, but not in their parents, disrupt specific sets of proteins that have related functions in the …

Neuroscience

'Placebo Sleep' Can Improve Cognitive Skills

If you tell people they slept better than they did, they are likely to perform better on math and word association tests.<p>If you can't get <i>real</i> sleep, perhaps you can make up for it with <i>placebo</i> sleep. Or such is the suggestion of a new study that found that people did better on cognitive tests after …

If You Can Smell This, You May Not Have Alzheimer's

A new diagnostic test involves a dollop of peanut butter.<p>You may not have heard of "the peanut butter test," but it could become a fantastically low-cost and non-invasive way to test for Alzheimer's. After all, what's less invasive than asking someone to smell some delicious peanut butter?<p>"The …

Why hospitals will soon sequence the genes of every single patient

After studying cases and training for years in medical school, doctors are able to identify patterns in a patient’s test results, compare them to that of a healthy individual and come up with a diagnostic and treatment. Better yet, they know how to adapt that treatment based on the patient’s age, …

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan: We’ve Reached “The End of Antibiotics, Period”

Dr. Arjun Srinivasan is an associate director at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He spoke with FRONTLINE about the need for more …

Calm wives may make for happier marriages

When it comes to keeping the peace after a heated argument, it may be more important for wives than for husbands to stay calm and keep emotions under …

Psychology

Preventative genetics: The ultimate way to halt disease

Can the information in our genes reveal serious medical issues years in advance? A leading geneticist thinks it’s possible.<p>We’re entering a new era that’s greatly enabled by progress in molecular biology and genetics, says George Church, Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School. It is not …

FYI: How Did English Get To Be The International Language Of Science?

Everyone got mad at the Germans.<p>More than 98 percent of all scientific articles published today are in English, but that hasn’t always been the case. “There used to be one language of science in Europe, and it was Latin,” says Michael Gordin, a historian of science at Princeton University who is …

Can We Eat Our Way To A Healthier Microbiome? It's Complicated

When our colleague Rob Stein got his microbiome analyzed recently in the name of science journalism, we were totally fascinated.<p>As Stein noted, it may be possible to cultivate a healthier community of bacteria on and inside us by modifying our diets.<p>Stein was advised to eat more garlic and leeks …

Your science questions answered

Q <b>Why don't winds blow across isobars?</b> asks Richard Thomas, via email<p>According to Dr Andrew Russell from Brunel University, winds blow almost parallel to the isobars because of the Earth's spin. "We are all on the rotating Earth," says Russell, "So when air starts to move from high to low pressure …

Follow your own path

Mike Taylor shot this photo in the Maine woods facing toward a warm autumn sun.<p>Mike calls this photo “Follow Your Own Path.” He wrote:<p>Be creative. …

Babies’ weak immune systems may benefit them

Newborns’ immune systems may be deliberately suppressed to help them make friends with microbes.<p>Babies suck at a lot of things. They can’t walk. They …

The 2013 Best Of What's New

Welcome to our annual list of inventions changing the world.<p>Each year, the editors of <i>Popular Science</i> search all corners of the material world—cars, skyscrapers, drones, phones—to find the 100 innovations that are reshaping the future right before our eyes.<p>Best of What’s New winners make our world …

How A Gene For Fair Skin Spread Across India

A study of skin color in the Indian subcontinent shows the complex movements of populations there.<p>Cover Girl, Maybelline, are you listening? A new study of skin color in South Asians finds they have enormous diversity, with a color range that's three times larger than that for East Asians or …

Drunk Without Alcohol Pill? UK Researcher Says a Pill Can Mimic the Effects of Alcohol

A “drunk without alcohol pill,” as it has been called, is being apparently developed by a U.K. scientist. The pill mimics the drunk effects of …

The next global pandemic is somewhere out there. The challenge is to stop it

The threat from a modern global epidemic is real - especially in a connected world<p>Walk past the endless rows of vegetables, past the dozens of stalls selling every possible part of a pig and, at the centre of Cao Lanh city's market, a woman is doing a brisk trade in selling rats for food. Two cages …

Depression may accelerate the aging process of our cells, study finds

Depression harms more than just the mind: research has linked the ailment with a host of physical conditions, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Now, fascinating new research suggests that depression might also accelerate the aging process at a cellular level.<p>In a study published …

Scared of the dentist? This is why, say neuroscientists

The whir of a dentist's drill might bring on the shakes and a racing heart, but what happens in the brain has long been a mystery.<p>Now researchers in Japan believe they are closer to an answer after scanning people's brains while playing them sounds of dental drills and suction instruments.<p>People …

How zinc ‘jams up’ these drug-resistant microbes

Zinc can “starve” <i>Streptococcus pneumoniae</i> microbes by preventing their uptake of an essential metal.<p>The finding opens the way for further work to …

Immune System

Beautiful Science: What Your Body Looks Like Under a Microscope (+Photos)

Imagine you have shrunk to a microscopic size and you are standing on a molecule inside a human body.<p>The molecule is as big as a planet under your …

Imaging

Your brain sees things you don’t

Our brains process visual input that we never consciously perceive. A study challenges currently accepted models about how the brain processes visual …

The Brain

Brain may be key factor in onset of diabetes

The brain may play a central role in type 2 diabetes, according to a new hypothesis that, if correct, suggests entirely new ways to prevent and treat …

Diabetes

Bacterial Competition In Lab Shows Evolution Never Stops

Evolution is relentless process that seems to keep going and going, even when creatures live in a stable, unchanging world.<p>That's the latest surprise from a unique experiment that's been underway for more than a quarter-century.<p>Evolution is so important for biology, medicine and a general …

‘Honest’ pheromones may explain decline in queen bees

Queen bees are always truthful with worker bees when it comes to communicating their reproductive status and quality.<p>And scientists say this may help …

Biology