Manabu Yoshida

28 Flips | 2 Magazines | 5 Likes | 1 Follower | @ManabuYoshida | Keep up with Manabu Yoshida on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Manabu Yoshida”

How to keep your Apple Watch display on longer in watchOS 2

Here’s another tip that’s snuck into watchOS 2: Did you know that you can keep your Apple Watch awake longer now while you’re using it?<p>Apple hasn’t mentioned this feature much, if at all; we couldn’t even find it on the details screen when we upgraded. But it’s a great addition to the firmware that …

Smartwatches

Googleがオンライン3D博物館を公開。古代の呪具から鰐の頭骨まで数百点を高精度3Dスキャン

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何百年も前から方程式で未知数といえば「x」ですが、 これ最初に使ったのはどこの誰よ!? 出ておいで! というおはなしを今日はしたいと思います。<p>代数学が生まれたのは、中世イスラム黄金時代(750~1258 AD)の中東。イスラムの支配と文化が遠くイベリア半島にまで拡大し、ムーア人が数学・科学を手厚く保護した権勢の絶頂期。Xの先祖は既に、ムハンマド・アル=フワーリズミーが記した9世紀の書「Kitab al-jabr …

蚊から身を守るために知っておくべき8つのこと|WIRED.jp

Gamma-Ray Flash Sets Astronomers All Atwitter

Space<p><b>Update for 2:30 p.m. ET May 28:</b> After the buzz broke, astronomers figured out that the flash was a false alarm. Check out the update.<p><b>Earlier:</b> A powerful flash of gamma rays, apparently coming from the Andromeda Galaxy, has set astronomers abuzz over the possibility that a clashing pair of …

Big Bang's Ripples: Two Scientists Recall Their Big Discovery

On May 20, 1964, two astronomers working at a New Jersey laboratory turned a giant microwave antenna toward what they thought would be a quiet part of the Milky Way. They weren't searching for anything; they were trying to make adjustments to their instrument before looking at more interesting …

100年前のロシアで撮られたカラー写真|WIRED.jp

Off mass-shell: Pythagoras to the LHC, via Einstein and Feynman

A few days ago, I wrote about a measurement of the "width" of the Higgs boson, meaning the width of its mass distribution. It is a bit of a surprise that particles even have a mass distribution; surely a particle should have a particular mass, not a distribution of different masses? The clue is in …

Cancer virus discovery helped by delayed flight

<b>Bad weather and a delayed flight might be a recipe for misery - but in one instance 50 years ago it led to a discovery that has saved countless thousands of lives.</b><p>The discovery of the Epstein Barr virus - named after British doctor Anthony Epstein - resulted from his specialist knowledge of viruses …

Tumors

A computer made a math proof the size of Wikipedia, and humans can't check it

If you thought the mathematical proofs you did in high school were long, you haven't seen the newest one out of the University of Liverpool — computer scientists Alexei Lisitsa and Boris Konev came up with a math proof that takes up a huge 13-gigabyte file, greater than all of Wikipedia's pages …

Sound, light and water waves and how scientists worked out the mathematics

What violins have in common with the sea – the wave principle<p>You're reading these words because light waves are bouncing off the letters on the page and into your eyes. The sounds of the rustling paper or beeps of your computer reach your ear via compression waves travelling through the air. Waves …

Celebrity pet: the rediscovery of Charles Darwin’s long-lost Galapagos tortoise

Name: 1874.6.1.6<br>Species: <i>Chelonoidis darwini</i><br>Dates: 1834-1837<br>Claim to fame: Darwin’s pet tortoise<br>Where now: Natural History Museum, London<p>When in the Galapagos, Charles Darwin and his Beagle chums ate a couple of dozen giant tortoises, tossing their empty shells over board en route to Tahiti. But in …

Why the universe may be nothing more than math

If you're not already a physicist, you need to mentally prepare yourself for MIT professor Max Tegmark's explanation of how our entire universe isn't just described by math, but <i>is</i> math. <i>Scientific American</i> published an excerpt from Tegmark's new book, <i>Our Mathematical Universe</i>, which explains that …

New observations where stars end and brown dwarfs begin

Georgia State University astronomers say they have found observational evidence for the theoretically predicted break between very low-mass stars and …

Universe

See a star that changes its brightness

Tonight, we zoom in on a variable star – a star whose brightness changes – near the bright star Vega in the small but distinctive constellation Lyra …

Astronomy

Peter Higgs: I wouldn't be productive enough for today's academic system

Peter Higgs, the British physicist who gave his name to the Higgs boson, believes no university would employ him in today's academic system because he would not be considered "productive" enough.<p>The emeritus professor at Edinburgh University, who says he has never sent an email, browsed the …

Peter Higgs interview: 'I have this kind of underlying incompetence'

The story of the physicist who gave his name to the Higgs boson particle is a charming tale about a quintessentially British national treasure. Ever since Peter Higgs was named as this year's Nobel prize winner, the tale has been endlessly retold, and goes like this.<p>Higgs struck upon his theory …

Could we harness power from black holes?

It might seem like an absurd idea, but physicists have long pondered whether black holes could one day be tapped for energy, says Phil Ball. But how possible is it?<p>Imagine the scene: highly advanced civilisations get enormous amounts of energy from black holes, be it extracting it from collapsed …

The Higgs boson does a new trick (probably)

At a seminar at CERN this morning, Aliaksandr Pranko announced an interesting new result on the Higgs boson from the ATLAS experiment.<p>In brief - we know the Higgs boson is there, and is involved in giving mass to some fundamental particles. Today we saw strong evidence that it gives mass to all of …

Brian Cox attacks 'nonsensical' plans to cut science funding and student grants

One of Britain's leading science personalities has said government plans to cut hundreds of millions in science funding and grant provision to poorer students are "nonsensical".<p>Professor Brian Cox said that proposals by the Department for Business Innovation & Skills (BIS) to slash science funding …

日本の「カワイイ」を世界へ--海外で人気集めるYouTube料理家 - CNET Japan

月に10億人以上が利用し、1分間に100時間もの動画が投稿されている世界最大の動画共有サイト「YouTube」。 …

How close are we to finding dark matter?

<b>Dark matter makes up about a quarter of the cosmos, but we still don't know what it is. As part of a two-part series called Light & Dark on BBC Four, physicist Jim Al-Khalili pondered how close we are to understanding the mysterious "dark stuff".</b><p>Given all the progress we've made in modern physics …

Dark Matter

World record setting experiment brings quantum computing a step closer to reality

Despite recent successes in the field, creating a quantum computer is <i>really</i> hard. For one thing quantum bits in a super positioned state (or qubits, the basic unit of data for quantum computing) have a hard time surviving at room temperature. Typically, these superposition states last for only a …

Wikileaksが「TPPの草案」を公開:知財関連の秘密文書|WIRED.jp

Stephen Hawking: physics would be 'more interesting' if Higgs boson hadn't been found

Physics would have been "far more interesting" if scientists had been unable to find the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider in Cern, according to Stephen Hawking.<p>The cosmologist was speaking at an event to mark the launch of a new exhibit about the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the Science …

What is Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle?

How the sun shines and why the vacuum of space is not actually empty<p>The uncertainty principle is one of the most famous (and probably misunderstood) ideas in physics. It tells us that there is a fuzziness in nature, a fundamental limit to what we can know about the behaviour of quantum particles …