Lourdes Toledo

6 Flips | 1 Magazine | 3 Likes | @LourdesTole2015 | Keep up with Lourdes Toledo on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Lourdes Toledo”

La foto del día del espacio 2015 (2) - El agujero de Lockman en rayos X

Una rosa cósmica<p>El telescopio MPG del Observatorio Europeo Austral (ESO) ha captado una nueva y espectacular imagen de la zona de formación estelar</b> …

Descubren que la Vía Láctea es mucho más grande de lo que se creía

Un nuevo estudio ha descubierto que nuestra galaxia, la Vía Láctea, en realidad es un 50% más grande de lo que se pensaba hasta ahora. Esto se debe a …

El pintor Ben Johnson lleva la representación arquitectónica a niveles increíbles de realismo

El pintor Ben Johnson lleva la representación arquitectónica a niveles increíbles de realismo<p><b>Ben Johnson</b> es un pintor preocupado por el realismo - …

SpaceX hace historia aterrizando el Falcon 9 tras poner 11 satélites en órbita

SpaceX lo ha conseguido. La startup de Elon Musk logra que el cohete Falcon 9 despegue y aterrice en tierra firme tras los intentos fallidos durante …

Photo: @rezaphotography // #Cambodia The land had been left to lie fallow for several long years, the terrible years of the Pol Pot regime. The wide field looked suitable for farming, with earth that could be plowed and sowed. But it lay abandoned, and a sign indicated that no trespassing was allowed because of antipersonnel mines. Some argue that planting mines helps protect an army’s positions. But those who have experienced war know that long after the peace treaties have been signed and the guns have gone silent, the “weapon of the coward” continues to carry on its work, for years. Craftily placed, a mine often hides where you don’t expect it, nestled in the gullies of a field, or concealed under some lush vegetation. Mines cause the highest number of civilian casualties, killing or maiming civilians throughout the world. Whereas antipersonnel mines bring tragedy to civilians, they bring fortunes to the companies that make them. It costs a dollar to manufacture a mine, but a hundred dollars to clear it. In Cambodia, as in every country where I had met people wounded by mines, the victims were usually adults. Even if children had many ways to set off a mine, such as chasing into a field after an animal, playing hide-and