Derek King

14 Flips | 1 Magazine | 1 Like | 3 Following | @KingNation | Keep up with Derek King on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Derek King”

A Life Worth Living: Albert Camus on Our Search for Meaning and Why Happiness Is Our Moral Obligation

<i>“To decide whether life is worth living is to answer the fundamental question of philosophy,”</i> <b>Albert Camus</b> (November 7, 1913–January 4, 1960) wrote in his 119-page philosophical essay <i>The Myth of Sisyphus</i> in 1942. <i>“Everything else … is child’s play; we must first of all answer the question.”</i> One of …

Sam Harris on the Paradox of Meditation and How to Stretch Our Capacity for Everyday Self-Transcendence

Montaigne believed that meditation is the finest exercise of one’s mind and David Lynch uses it as an anchor of his creative integrity. Over the centuries, the ancient Eastern practice has had a variety of exports and permutations in the West, but at no point has it been more vital to our sanity …

Legendary Choreographer Merce Cunningham on Life, Learning, and the Creative Experience

Despite what today’s plethora of books on creativity might indicate, it wasn’t until the second half the twentieth century — with the notable exception of Graham Wallace’s famous 1926 model for the four stages of ideation — that psychology turned to creativity as a formal area of study, bringing to …

A Minimalist, Maximally Imaginative Geometric Allegory for the Essence of Friendship and Creativity

For more than a decade, Brooklyn’s family-owned indie powerhouse Enchanted Lion has been publishing immeasurably thoughtful and lyrical picture-books that invite young minds of all ages to explore such subtleties of the human experience as loneliness, loyalty, loss, the unknown, and the rhythms of …

The Virtuous Cycle of Gratitude and Mutual Appreciation: The Letters of Hermann Hesse and Thomas Mann

In a culture that makes it easier to be a critic than a celebrator, where it takes growing commitment to do the opposite, how heartening to be reminded of the ennobling gift of gratitude, of the elevating capacity of being one another’s champion — reminders like Charles Bukowski’s letter of …

Artist Anne Truitt on the Ideal Daily Routine and How Parenting Shapes Our Capacity for Savoring Solitude

I have a longstanding fascination with the daily routines of writers, particularly with the psychology behind them.<p>Due in no small part to the fact that she was formally trained as a psychologist before becoming one of the most important artists of the twentieth century, <b>Anne Truitt</b> (March 16, …

The Curse of Meh: Why Being Extraordinary Is Not a Matter of Being Universally Liked but of Being Polarizing

“To be universally liked is to be relatively ignored.”<p>After spending the entirety of my adult life as a noncitizen immigrant in America, perpetually toiling at the mercy of various visas, I am currently applying for something known as an “extraordinary ability green card” — a document granted to …

Why Haters Hate: Kierkegaard Explains the Psychology of Bullying and Online Trolling in 1847

Celebrated as the first true existentialist philosopher, Danish writer and thinker <b>Søren Kierkegaard</b> (May 5, 1813–November 11, 1855) may have only lived a short life, but it was a deep one and its impact radiated widely outward, far across the centuries and disciplines and schools of thought. He was …

The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design and the Line Between Editing and Censorship

“More isn’t always better: no more in information design than in poetry…”<p>Once again this year, I was delighted to serve on the “Brain Trust” for an annual project by Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, <i>New Yorker</i> writer, and <i>Scientific American</i> neuroscience blog editor Gareth Cook, who culls the best, …

Hannah Arendt on Memory, the Elasticity of Time, and What Free Will Really Means

Since 1888, the annual Gifford Lectures series has aimed “to promote and diffuse the study of natural theology in the widest sense of the term” by bringing together influential thinkers across science, philosophy, and spirituality — luminaries like William James, Werner Heisenberg, Niels Bohr, and …

Man Meets Woman: Minimalist Pictogram Commentary on Gender Norms

<i>“It’s a special kind of privilege to be born into the body you wanted, to embrace the essence of your gender even as you recognize what you are up against,”</i> a wise young woman wrote. And yet, as Margaret Mead knew and Shonda Rhimes attested, what one is up against might often eclipse any …

Friedrich Nietzsche on Why a Fulfilling Life Requires Embracing Rather than Running from Difficulty

German philosopher, poet, composer, and writer <b>Friedrich Nietzsche</b> (October 15, 1844–August 25, 1900) is among humanity’s most enduring, influential, and oft-cited minds — and he seemed remarkably confident that he would end up that way. Nietzsche famously called the populace of philosophers …

Are Writers Born or Made? Jack Kerouac on the Crucial Difference Between Talent and Genius

<i>“All of us, we’re links in a chain,”</i> Pete Seeger observed in pondering the nature of creative work. Mark Twain put it much less mildly in his lively letter of solidarity to Helen Keller: <i>“Substantially all ideas are second-hand, consciously and unconsciously drawn from a million outside sources, and</i> …

Ursula K. Le Guin on Being a Man

Who are we when we, to borrow Hannah Arendt’s enduring words, “are together with no one but ourselves”? However much we might exert ourselves on learning to stop letting others define us, the definitions continue to be hurled at us — definitions predicated on who we should be in relation to some …