John_MacLean

23 Flips | 3 Magazines | 5 Following | @John_MacLean | Keep up with John_MacLean on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “John_MacLean”

Stem cells (via)

Stem cells (via)

Gates-backed research into baker's yeast could end shortage of vital malaria drugs

After many years of research, there’s still no effective vaccine for malaria, a parasite that kills hundreds of thousands yearly in Africa and Asia. But scientists have figured out a way to mass-produce the most effective treatment at industrial scale using a genetically engineered strain of …

Analysis: Big brain projects highlight drug research gaps | Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) - Governments on both sides of the Atlantic are placing big new bets on the future of brain science, just as much of the pharmaceutical industry retreats from the field.<p>A laboratory assistant holds one hemisphere of a healthy brain in the Morphological unit of psychopathology in …

Hydrogel turns mouse brain transparent

<b>STANFORD (US) —</b> A new technique can make a mouse brain transparent, allowing researchers to probe its intact wiring and structures with light and …

Stanford University

Gender gap in the ‘Women’s Olympics’

<b>USC (US) / U. TORONTO (CAN) —</b> The 2012 Olympic Games in London was the first time all participating nations allowed women to compete, but there were …

University of Toronto

Artificially reconnecting damaged tissue could restore movement in paralytics

Paralyzed individuals currently rely on robotic prosthetics to recover their lost movement, but new research shows that natural movement may be able to be restored by reconnecting damaged parts of an individual's nervous system. Researchers in Tokyo, Japan and Seattle, Washington demonstrated that …

How your brain chunks ‘moments’ into ‘events’

<b>PRINCETON (US) —</b> Scientists say they have a new explanation for how the brain breaks experiences into “events,” or the related groups that help us …

Princeton University

Why your ‘seesaw’ brain can’t stay on task

<b>U. FLORIDA (US) —</b> When we try to concentrate on a specific task, different parts of our brain are in a constant battle for control behind the …

Neuroscience

A Harvard Neuroscience Scheme To Change Decisions In Your Brain

A researcher wants to reverse your choices before you even know you've made them.<p>This week at the British Neuroscience Association, Harvard scientist Gabriel Kreiman described a rather diabolical-sounding experiment: He wants to reverse someone's decision to push a button before the person is even …

New music 'rewarding for the brain'

<b>Listening to new music is rewarding for the brain, a study suggests.</b><p>Using MRI scans, a Canadian team of scientists found that areas in the reward centre of the brain became active when people heard a song for the first time.<p>The more the listener enjoyed what they were hearing, the stronger the …

Why your brain loves music

New neuroscience study sets out to explain why in some respects music offers the same sort of pleasure as a really good thriller.<p>The love affair between <b>music</b> and neuroscience just keeps going and going. And this isn’t surprising because music’s power over us is so huge, and so odd. It’s not like …

If climate heats up, will Boston Marathon slow down?

<b>BOSTON U. (US) —</b> Future winning times in the Boston Marathon may slow as the climate continues to warm, experts say.<p>Running times are already …

Marathons

Down The Gullet: A Guided Tour Of Your Guts

In <i>Gulp. Adventures on the Alimentary Canal</i>, science writer Mary Roach takes a journey through the gut, from the secret healing powers of saliva to the taxonomy of poop. Along the trip, she serves up odd medical anecdotes, such as the story of William Beaumont, an eccentric surgeon who once ate …

Looking To Nature For Antibiotic Inspirations

Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacterial cells, employ an arsenal of chemical weapons. Microbiologist Vincent Fischetti of Rockefeller University describes using tricks learned from the phage in developing new antibiotics that may be effective even where others fail.<p>Transcript<p>FLORA LICHTMAN, …

Brain scans reveal the ‘signature’ of pain

<b>U. MICHIGAN (US) —</b> In the first objective measure of pain, scientists find that its brain “signature” is the same for everyone.<p>The findings, …

The Brain

Immune system ‘trainer’ cells don’t quit

<b>EMORY (US) —</b> Follicular helper T cells, which are important for generating potent antibodies, stick around even after a viral infection is over, new …

Immune System

What You Need To Know About The New Bird Flu

The H7N9 avian flu virus outbreak in China has already killed 11 people. Here's what's up with it.<p>There have been some new developments in China's struggle with bird flu over the past two days, including another confirmed death and a scientific report from Chinese researchers about the first three …

The seaside town of Azenhas do Mar in Sintra, Portugal. Photo by Ricardo Bahuto Felix: http://bit.ly/Z64jtR

The manatee is thriving in Florida's Kings Bay—and so is tourism. (Photo by Paul Nicklen) Humans mean well, but they sometimes get too close for the endangered sea cows' comfort. Get a closer look: http://on.natgeo.com/17vZZaT

Around two hours’ walk north of Namche Bazaar, the largest town in Nepal’s Khumbu region, there is a fork in the trail. Veer right, and you are headed towards Everest Base Camp. Veer left, however, ascending stone stairs that seem to almost hang off the mountain’s edge, and the trail follows the course of the Dudh Kosi, or Milk River, into a valley that is more remote and less trafficked by trekkers than the “Everest Highway” into Base Camp. http://bit.ly/17vVQ6I