Gerrit

58 Flips | 2 Magazines | 10 Likes | @GerritDJonker | Keep up with Gerrit on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Gerrit”

What Can We Do About Junk Science?

As skewed or phony studies about vaccines, GMOs, radiation, and other hot-button topics show up in journals that masquerade as legitimate science publications, junk science becomes harder to distinguish from real research.<p><b>In 2013 radiation expert Robert Emery</b> examined a research paper in his office …

How Mouse Studies Lead Medical Research Down Dead Ends

Most experimental drugs fail before they make it through all the tests required to figure out if they actually work and if they're safe. But some drugs get fairly far down that road, at the cost of hundreds of millions of dollars, based on poorly conducted studies at the outset.<p>Medical researchers …

No-Kill Caviar Aims To Keep The Treat And Save The Sturgeon

Caviar was once the food of kings and czars — and for a sturgeon, it meant death.<p>But a new technique of massaging the ripe eggs from a female sturgeon — without killing or even cutting the fish open— could make caviar more abundant, more affordable, and more accessible to all.<p>Best of all, says …

Redesigning A Less Wasteful New York City, With Giant Trash-Composting Parks

The city spends millions a year to send its heaping piles of waste as far away as Texas. Two local architects have created a new vision of processing trash locally: 10 composting “hubs” that double as parkland around the city’s waterfronts.<p>Much of New York City was built on top of trash generated …

New York City

Deepwater Horizon Spill May Be Responsible For Heart Defects In Fish

Fish that were exposed to oil when they were young will be unlikely to survive to reproduce.<p>Nearly 170,000 gallons of oil have spilled into Texas' Galveston Bay, threatening bird habitat and serving as a reminder of the lasting effects of such disasters. The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill exposed …

This Is Your Brain On No Sleep

If you’ve been skipping sleep, thinking you’ll make up for it on weekends, here’s some bad news. Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania and Peking University have found that chronic sleep loss may actually lead to irreversible damage to and loss of brain cells.<p>“We live in a society where each …

The Editor's Letter From The April 2014 Issue Of Popular Science Magazine

The virtues of curiosity<p>Albert Einstein had no shortage of colorful quotes, but my favorite is perhaps his best known. In a letter to the biographer Carl Seelig in 1952, he wrote, “I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious.” When Einstein penned those words, he was already the …

Narwhal's Trademark Tusk Acts Like a Sensor, Scientist Says

The Arctic whale's tusk is actually a tooth that can grow more than nine feet long; it has baffled people for centuries.<p><b>The arctic whale known as the narwhal is famous for the spiral tusk protruding from its head, but scientists have long battled over the horn's purpose.</b><p>On Tuesday, scientists …

Do today's scientific practices really suppress brilliant breakthroughs?

Are scientific mavericks, such as the flamboyant and brilliant bongo-playing Richard Feynman, an extinct product of the 20th century? And is science today relatively too staid and constrained to deliver the great breakthroughs such mavericks used to make? In a letter to the Guardian on Tuesday, UCL …

FYI: Does Thinking Too Hard Wear You Out?

If it does, it's all in your head.<p>The brain makes up about 1⁄50 of our body weight but consumes about one fifth of the oxygen we breathe. It's natural to assume that overtaxing the cerebrum would leave one feeling lethargic, but that's not quite true. The brain uses most of its energy just to …

How to learn like a memory champion

Companies are creating learning aids that tap the science of memories, says David Robson. Do they work in the classroom?<p>For most of his 20s, Ed Cooke had been hovering around the top 10 of the World Memory Championships. His achievements included memorising 2,265 binary digits in 30 minutes and the …

Oxford University

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What's old is new again: newly discovered songbird family is ancient

Scientists analysing songbird DNA discovered that the spotted wren-babbler is neither a wren nor a wren-babbler, nor even a babbler. Instead, it represents an old evolutionary family that has no close living relatives.<p>A newly published study has uncovered a previously unknown family of songbirds …

How Wolves Change Rivers - video

Wolves are crucial for maintaining a healthy ecosystem -- a fact that was conveniently forgotten when they were exterminated from almost all of the continental United States by ranchers, farmers, trappers and hunters.<p>Meanwhile, the populations of other animals exploded. The entire ecosystem of the …

It's time we fell back in love with science

A few decades ago, we used to revere scientists as heroes. These days, it feels like the Enlightenment has gone into reverse, says Alex Proud<p>Growing up in the 1970s, I loved science. I watched Tommorow’s World, I subscribed to a comic called Science and I spent hours trying to make bombs and …

Scientists Fear Ecological Disaster In Nicaragua's Planned Canal

Scientists are raising the alarm about the possible environmental consequences of a huge shipping canal that could cut across Nicaragua, from the Pacific to the Atlantic.<p>The government of this Central American nation has signed a deal with a Chinese company that is planning to build a maritime …

Three new species of marsupial with suicidal sex habits discovered

Rare among mammals, the antechinus male copulates to the point of disintegration<p>The rat-sized antechinus rose to infamy last year when it was revealed that males of the species literally killed themselves through overly vigorous sex sessions. Living no longer than a year, they would spend the …

Oil, Gas Drilling Seems To Make The Earth Slip And Go Boom

There's been a surge in earthquakes in the U.S. over the last few years. In Texas, there are 10 times the number of earthquakes now than just a few years ago.<p>Scientists say it's likely linked to the boom in oil and gas activity, meaning that people who never felt the ground shake are starting …

Starlings at Sunset | video

This video tracks the movements of each individual bird in this murmuration of starlings as they sit on power lines, pause and fly as the sun sets.<p>Once again, it is Caturday, so you all know what that means: let's watch a video!<p>As a birder, one of the things that fascinates me is the motion of …

Archaeologists discover 800,000-year-old footprints on an English beach

A team of archaeologists has discovered a crucial clue to human ancestry in a set of 800,000-year-old footprints left in a beachside sediment bed in England. The prints offer an important look into early human habitation in northern Europe, with height estimates suggesting the prints were left by a …

How did I get here?

This week I took my dad to Geneva, to show him CERN, and ATLAS, the experiment I work on at the Large Hadron Collider. Describing my job to people reminds me of how privileged and fortunate I am to be working on a project which would have been beyond my wildest dreams as a child, and the feeling is …

Chickens Wear Prosthetic Dinosaur Tails, For Science

Simulating ancient gaits with barnyard fowl<p>The humble chicken is distantly related to the _T. rex. _This raises an important scientific question: How could we make chickens walk like they're little dinosaurs? A new study provides the equally important answer! And also video!<p>Researchers from the …

Can Facebook make you sad?

Studies suggest that browsing Facebook can make you unhappy, says Justin Mullins. Why might that be? This article originally published in February 2014 explains.<p>Not so long ago a new form of communication swept the world, transforming life in ways unimagined just a few years before. One commentator …

Social Media

Woolly Mammoths' Taste For Flowers May Have Been Their Undoing

They were some of the largest, hairiest animals ever to walk the Earth, but new research shows a big part of the woolly mammoth's diet was made up of tiny flowers.<p>The work is based on DNA analysis of frozen arctic soil and mammoth poop. It suggests that these early vegans depended on the flowers as …

Vertical farming explained: how cities could be food producers of the future

Populations are growing and cities are booming – but could we soon see skyscrapers turned into centres for crop production? From Chicago warehouses to the south pole growth chamber in Antarctica, the concept of growing food indoors is catching on. Plant scientist Dr Erik Murchie, from the …

Using Unique Hip Twist, Salamander Can Leap 10 Times Its Body Length

Twist & shout, you slippery little creature.<p>Lungless salamanders possess relatively weak legs. But don't step to this little amphibian--they would beat humans in an interspecies jumping competition, at least compared to their size. Several species of lungless salamanders (in the family …

New therapies offer bright hope against the darkness of depression

The numbers are staggering: Almost 7% of the U.S. adult population — about 17.6 million people — is diagnosed with depression, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that depression costs 200 million lost workdays each …

Depression

Half-siders: A tale of two birdies

Also known as "halfsiders" or tetragametic chimæras, these unusual birds are actually two genetically distinct individuals -- twins -- fused into one being.<p>I recently stumbled across a video that has been attracting quite a bit of discussion. This video shows a captive-bred pet budgerigar,</i> …