GeoMap80

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The Future of the Brain: An Introduction

More than 2,300 years ago Aristotle famously wrote that we are more than the sum of our parts. This nugget of wisdom still resonates today, for at …

Memory: Why cramming for tests often fails

You may think you know your own mind, but when it comes to memory, research suggests that you don't. If we’re trying to learn something, many of us study in ways that prevent the memories sticking. Fortunately, the same research also reveals how we can supercharge our learning.<p>We’ve all had to face …

The Brain

Did Aristotle invent science? – podcast

This week on Science Weekly with <b>Ian Sample</b> we meet evolutionary biologist Armand Leroi to discuss his latest book The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science. Armand explains why he believes Aristotle's structured approach to understanding the natural world formed the intellectual bedrock of the …

5 Apps First Responders Use to Save Lives

Many agencies are now saving lives with something you may take for granted: mobile apps. From crime scenes to five-alarm fires, this is how emergency responders use smartphone applications to share information, manage emergencies, and keep you safe.<p>Many agencies are now saving lives with something …

His brain injury made him a math genius: Science explains why

<b>(Digital Storm via Shutterstock)</b><p>Scientists explain Jason Padgett’s rare syndrome, and examine the possibility that we all have dormant abilities<p>Sarah Gray<p>May 6, 2014 9:45pm (UTC)<p>In his memoir, "Struck By Genius: How a Brain Injury Made Me a Mathematical Marvel", excerpted by Salon, Jason Padgett …

Engineer decodes cryptic notes in 1504 edition of the Odyssey

When a 16-century Venetian edition of Homer’s <i>Odyssey</i> surfaced in 2007, the text included handwritten notes in the margins in an unknown script. The …

Universe recreated in massive computer simulation

Researchers have created the most detailed simulation of the history of the universe, complete with exploding gas clouds, swirling galaxies, ravenous black holes and countless stars – born to die in violent supernovae that blast the chemical elements for planets and life out into the …

The 'Brain App' That's Better Than Spritz

We all have so much to read these days. Wouldn’t it be nice if we could read it <i>faster</i>? The possibility that this fond wish could actually be granted …

How to create a successful science blog | Kelly Oakes

Setting up your own science blog is a great way to publicise a field that is close to your heart, hone your writing skills and make a name for yourself<p><i>The Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize, in association with the Guardian and the Observer, is open for entries. The closing date is 11 May …

The Future of the Mind by Michio Kaku, review

Michio Kaku's latest is a mind-bending study of the possibilities of the brain<p><b>Quadriplegics move artificial limbs with the mind</b>. Video games are directly controlled by the power of thought. A monkey’s brain connected to the internet can control an avatar on a video screen or a robot half a world …

Twenty Years of Alzheimer’s Research May Have Focused on the Wrong Protein

Most researchers think the disease is caused by the build-up of beta amyloid. But over 100 drugs targeting it have failed. Have they been focusing on …

No Forgery Evidence Seen in "Gospel of Jesus's Wife" Papyrus

Scientists find no evidence of fakery in an ancient papyrus scrap saying that Jesus had a wife.<p>Did Jesus have a wife? A controversial papyrus scrap making that suggestion dates to the eighth century A.D., assert a series of just-released scientific reports, which may point to earlier Christian …

Do Scientists Pray? Einstein Answers a Little Girl’s Question about Science vs. Religion

Whether in their inadvertently brilliant reflections on gender politics or in their seemingly simple but profound questions about how the world works, kids have a singular way of stripping the most complex of cultural phenomena down to their bare essence, forcing us to reexamine our layers of …

Incredible Maps Capture the Genetics and Connections of the Brain

On April 2, 2013, the Obama administration announced an ambitious project to map the activity of every neuron in the human brain by 2023. One year later, we are starting to see the amazing results.<p><b>Scientists cannot hope to prevent or cure neurological disease</b> without a solid understanding of what …

How to write a science news story | Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize | Ian Sample

The Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize 2014, in association with the Guardian and the Observer, is open for entries. In parallel with the competition we're publishing a series of weekly "how to …" guides for budding science journalists<p>Most journalists want to break exclusives, but a lot of what …

The origin of twins

(Medical Xpress)—The egregious presumption of universal fact has a long history in science. The ever popular Giordano Bruno was burned at the stake …

What is Alzheimer's disease? - Ivan Seah Yu Jun

Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, affecting over 40 million people worldwide. And though it was discovered over a century …

Dolphin-Squeak-To-English Translator Works In Real Time

You had me at "seaweed."<p>For the first time ever, a device has enabled people to translate a dolphin whistle in real time. The dolphin's first word was "sargassum," a type of seaweed.<p>"I was like whoa! We have a match. I was stunned," researcher Denise Herzing told New Scientist. At the time, in …

Black death skeletons reveal pitiful life of 14th-century Londoners

The 25 skeletons unearthed in the Clerkenwell area of London a year ago may hold the key to the truth about the nature of the Black Death that ravaged Britain and Europe in the mid-14th century.<p>A Channel 4 documentary on Sunday will claim that analysis of the bodies and of wills registered in …

How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene

Back in the 1970s, a geneticist named Mary-Claire King decided she needed to figure out why women in some families were much more likely to get breast cancer.<p>It took 17 years for King and her colleague to identify the single gene that could cause both breast and ovarian cancer. During that time, …

In Most Ambitious DNA Building Project Ever, Scientists Make An Artificial Yeast Chromosome

We're constructing ever-more-complicated creatures in labs.<p>Humans have been engineering yeast "for thousands of years," says Jef Boeke, a researcher with New York University's medical center who is one of the world's top yeast biology experts. At first, I thought he was exaggerating. Yeast has been …

Genetics

Watson’s Next Challenge: Smarter Cancer Treatments

New innovations in computational biology are changing the way researchers tackle cancer and diabetes. Can algorithms find drug treatments that human doctors can’t?<p>Computational biology–the application of coding, mathematical models, and large-scale data processing to biology–hasn’t turned into a …

Relativity Isn't Relative

How your brain works – video

The size of a small cauliflower, the human brain is the most complex organ in your body. It squeezes out 70,000 thoughts a day. But where does it store information? And how does it generate flights of fancy? Explore the inner workings of your personal ideas factory Continue reading...

How our brain networks: White matter 'scaffold' of human brain revealed

For the first time, neuroscientists have systematically mapped the white matter "scaffold" of the human brain, the critical communications network …

Brain Methylation Map Published

SCOT NICHOLLSResearchers have made an extensive map of several types of methylation in the brains of mice and humans. The work, described in <i>Science</i> …

Blood Test Predicts Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer's can be predicted three years in advance with new blood test

All it takes to predict an individual's likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease within the next two to three years is a blood test, according to a study published yesterday in <i>Nature Medicine</i>. The test, <i>New Scientist</i> reports, detects the concentrations of 10 chemicals that are associated with …