6 Added | 1 Magazine | 1 Like | @Emily6e29 | Keep up with Emily on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Emily”

Lightning lighting up a cloud.

Somniloquy III

The 19 best drone photos of 2014

The sky is the limit when it comes to creative uses of drones for photography — see for example Dronestagram or the <i>National Geographic</i> magazine …

APOD: Descent to a Comet (2014 Nov 13) Image Credit: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap141113.html Explanation: Yesterday, the first soft landing on a comet took place some 500 million kilometers from planet Earth as the Rosetta mission lander Philae settled on the nucleus of C67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The landing site, dubbed Agilkia, is located near the center of this remarkable image snapped by Philae's ROLIS (ROsetta Lander Imaging System) camera. Taken from a distance of about 3 kilometers the image has a resolution of about 3 meters per pixel at the surface. After Philae's release from the orbiter, its seven-hour long descent was made without propulsion or guidance. Following its descent the lander is in place, though its anchoring harpoon system did not fire. For 2.5 days the lander is intended to conduct its main science mission returning extensive images and data. An extended surface mission may be possible if sunlight and dust conditions allow solar panels to recharge Philae's battery. http://rosetta.esa.int/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=141113 #APOD

APOD: Orion in Gas, Dust, and Stars (2014 Nov 11) Image Copyright: Roberto Colombari, Robert Gendler & Federico Pelliccia; Data: DSS PLOSS II http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap141111.html Explanation: The constellation of Orion holds much more than three stars in a row. A deep exposure shows everything from dark nebula to star clusters, all embedded in an extended patch of gaseous wisps in the greater Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The brightest three stars on the far left are indeed the famous three stars that make up the belt of Orion. Just below Alnitak, the lowest of the three belt stars, is the Flame Nebula, glowing with excited hydrogen gas and immersed in filaments of dark brown dust. Below and left of the frame center and just to the right of Alnitak lies the Horsehead Nebula, a dark indentation of dense dust that has perhaps the most recognized nebular shapes on the sky. On the upper right lies M42, the Orion Nebula, an energetic caldron of tumultuous gas, visible to the unaided eye, that is giving birth to a new open cluster of stars. Immediately to the left of M42 is a prominent bluish reflection nebula sometimes called the Running Man that houses many bright blue stars. The featured image covers an area with objects that are roughly 1,500 light years away and spans about 75 light years. http://www.astrobin.com/users/rob77/ http://www.robgendlerastropics.com/ http://www.astrobin.com/users/SkyHunter/ http://archive.stsci.edu/cgi-bin/dss_form Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=141111 #APOD

APOD: NGC 4762: A Galaxy on the Edge (2014 Nov 05) Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap141105.html Explanation: Why is there a bright line on the sky? What is pictured above is actually a disk galaxy being seen almost perfectly edge on. The image from the Hubble Space Telescope is a spectacular visual reminder of just how thin disk galaxies can be. NGC 4762, a galaxy in the nearby Virgo Cluster of Galaxies, is so thin that it is actually difficult to determine what type of disk galaxy it is. Its lack of a visible dust lane indicates that it is a low-dust lenticular galaxy, although it is still possible that a view from on top would reveal spiral structure. The unusual stellar line spans about 100,000 light years from end to end. Near NGC 4762's center is a slight bulge of stars, while many background galaxies are visible far in the distance. Galaxies that appear this thin are rare mostly because our Earth must reside (nearly) in the extrapolated planes of their thin galactic disks. Galaxies that actually are this thin are relatively common -- for example our own Milky Way Galaxy is thought to be about this thin. http://www.spacetelescope.org/ http://www.nasa.gov/hubble Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=141105 #APOD