Derek Edwards

702 Flips | 3 Magazines | 28 Likes | 46 Following | 110 Followers | @Edwards_Editor | Flipboard User

The Persistent Crime of Nazi-Looted Art

The discovery of more than 1,500 artworks in a flat in Munich serves as an inconvenient reminder of one of the unresolved wrongs of the Third Reich.<p>The discovery, when it was made, came entirely by chance. On September 22, 2010, a stooped, white-haired man in his late 70s taking an evening train …

Museums

The Mark of a Masterpiece

The man who keeps finding famous fingerprints on uncelebrated works of art.<p>Every few weeks, photographs of old paintings arrive at Martin Kemp’s eighteenth-century house, outside Oxford, England. Many of the art works are so decayed that their once luminous colors have become washed out, their …

How a Single Gene Could Become a Volume Knob for Pain—and End America's Opioid Epidemic | WIRED

End Pain Forever<p>How a Single Gene Could<p>Become a Volume<p>Knob for Human Suffering<p>How a Single Gene Could Become a Volume Knob for Human Suffering<p>by …

Long-form Journalism

The Elephants’ Crematorium

Liyana had seen elephants form into protective circles when calves were threatened, but this was different. These days, animal behavior was all but …

Mind

Mozart on the Kalahari

It took Michael “Meek” Prouder half an hour to magtube from Claremont to the Coachella Valley desert, near the Nestlé Reservoir entertainment pier. …

Grandparents

At the Flip of a Switch

<i>If I stood on the bowbacked chair, I could reach<br>the light switch. They let me and they watched me,<br>A touch of the little pip would work the magic.</i><br>— …

Sigmund Freud

The Bloody Family History of the Guillotine

In 1788, a French blacksmith named Mathurin Louschart was killed in his home by a single blow to the head. The act was committed in the blink of an eye, but the feud motivating it had festered for months. Earlier that year, the deeply conservative Mathurin had apparently taken offense at his son …

French History

They Are Watching You—and Everything Else on the Planet

Magazine<p>Technology and our increasing demand for security have put us all under surveillance. Is privacy becoming just a memory?<p><b>About 10:30 on a Saturday morning</b> in the north London borough of Islington, two men on mopeds race down the shopping corridor of Upper Street. Sheathed in helmets, gloves, …

Imaging

Don’t Tell Me Star Destroyers Can’t Accelerate

What materials did the Empire use to build their fleets?<p>I once had a professor tell me that it would be impossible for an Imperial Star Destroyer to …

Physics

Yawns Innumerable | Matthew Sherrill

In February 1831, some two years after suffering a humiliating defeat in his presidential reelection bid, and two weeks before assuming office as a …

Literature

The Other Political Correctness

There is an epidemic of self-censorship at U.S. universities on the subject of China, one that limits debate and funnels students and academics away …

China

How an ICBM commander learned to stop worrying and love the bomb

GREAT FALLS, Mont. — In between training for doomsday, the women and men of the 12th Missile Squadron stood at attention when their new commander entered the conference room.<p>They had heard the rumors, even out in the underground capsules across the Montana countryside where they wait for an order …

Military

CABINET // The Internet of Snails

Summer 2015<p>The Internet of Snails<p>Justin E. H. Smith<p>Honoré Daumier, <i>Les escargots non sympathiques</i>, published in <i>Le Charivari</i>, 25 September 1869. …

Inside the Murky World of Butterfly Catchers

Magazine<p>For those who capture and trade the delicate insect, the rules are intricate and the prize is mesmerizing.<p>It can be a treacherous thing, hunting this particular butterfly.<p>The peacock swallowtail, <i>Papilio blumei,</i> lives only here, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, and only at a certain …

Nature

The last man who knew everything

It has been a long time since anyone knew everything.<p>In the Middle Ages there were any number of friars, like Vincent of Beauvais, who had absorbed …

Literature

The Last Days of the Blue-Blood Harvest

Every year, more than 400,000 crabs are bled for the miraculous medical substance that flows through their bodies—now pharmaceutical companies are finally committing to an alternative that doesn't harm animals.<p>Horseshoe crabs are sometimes called “living fossils” because they have been around in …

The Entire History of Steel

From hunks of iron streaking through the sky, to the construction of skyscrapers and megastructures, this is the history of the world's greatest alloy.<p>The story of steel begins long before bridges, I-beams, and skyscrapers. It begins in the stars.<p>Billions of years before humans walked the …

Black Sea

Who owns the space under cities? The attempt to map the earth beneath us

The space under cities is getting busier – from transport excavations to billionaire’s mega-basements. So how to keep track of what’s down there?<p>Just over a year ago I was sent a photograph of a tunnel-boring machine in a dirt lot in Los Angeles. The caption read: “Elon Musk is about to start …

Southern California

How an Obsession With Rare Bird Feathers Turned Criminal

Wildlife Watch<p>In a bizarre heist, a young musician broke into the British Natural History Museum at Tring to steal exotic birds.<p>“This is a very unusual crime,” Detective Inspector Fraser Wylie of the Hertfordshire Constabulary, in southern England, said at the time.<p>It happened one night in November …

Natural History Museum

The Ghost Of V.C. Andrews: The Life, Death, And Afterlife Of The Mysterious "Flowers In The Attic" Author

At age 56, an unknown, wheelchair-bound writer from Virginia published a gothic teen-horror classic and became a phenomenon. Seven years later, she was dead, yet her name and legacy have lived on in nearly 70 subsequent books. For the first time ever, her family and colleagues tell the story of …

The Thieves Who Steal Sunken Warships, Right Down to the Bolts

Last November, a team of international divers departed the Indonesian island of Java on a mission to survey sunken World War II warships. The Dutch government had tasked them to assess the condition of two particular Dutch vessels, the Hr. Ms. <i>Java</i> and Hr. Ms. <i>De Ruyter</i>, both sunk in 1942 during the …

Burning Out: What Really Happens Inside a Crematorium

Four decades ago, less than 5 percent of Americans were cremated. Now that figure stands at nearly 50 percent. This is how cremation actually works, and the story of what happens to a culture when its attitudes about memorializing the dead undergo a revolution.<p>Rosehill Cemetery in Linden, New …

Hammacher Schlemmer: The World’s Most Peculiar Company

Advertisement<p>In Hammacher Schlemmer’s lobby museum hangs an enlarged and framed page from the 1878 New York phone directory, the city’s first, upon …

Selling

Farewell, Doraemon by A Que

I escaped the city and returned home on a winter’s day. A vast gloomy sky, whitish-gray as the belly of a dead fish, stretched out in front of me. …

The Business of Blending In

<b>In his dark blue jacket and red trousers,</b> the French soldier cut a dashing figure on the battlefield at the turn of the 20th century. It was a …

Military

Sound Design: How Movie-Makers Create The Sound of Violence

<i>Hey all, Ernie here with a piece from Andrew Egan about a specific kind of movie magic—the kind you hear, whether during a dramatic fall or the crack</i> …

Why New Antibiotics Are So Hard to Find - Issue 60: Searches

An 86-year-old patient arrives with a grisly foot injury.1 It’s badly infected—not a surprise, given his chronic untreated Type 2 diabetes. What is …

Medicine

Reading the Soil

If the earth is wet enough and acidic enough, the first thing you’ll find when you start digging up a grave is a coffin-shaped halo in the ground. …

The Jaguar Is Made for the Age of Humans

A writer comes face-to-face with the cat deep in the Amazon jungle and left with a new understanding of its surprising resilience to poaching and habitat loss.<p>“There’s a jaguar in the <i>baño</i>,” George Olah told me with a small smile.<p>“Um?” I managed, squinting into the dusky Amazon forest surrounding …