Diane Jane Gray

17 Flips | 2 Magazines | 1 Like | @Didigray | Keep up with Diane Jane Gray on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Diane Jane Gray”

Reading the minds of the ‘dead’

Thousands of patients remain trapped in a vegetative state between life and death. Three scientists are working to free them, as Roger Highfield reports.<p>“Imagine you wake up, locked inside a box,” says Adrian Owen. "It's a perfect fit, down to every last one of your fingers and toes. It's a strange …

The Brain

Epigenetics 101: a beginner’s guide to explaining everything

Epigenetics is one of the hottest fields in the life sciences. It’s a phenomenon with wide-ranging, powerful effects on many aspects of biology, and enormous potential in human medicine. As such, its ability to fill in some of the gaps in our scientific knowledge is mentioned everywhere from …

Installing the world's first electronic spine

In <i>The Washington Post</i> this week, reporter Jim Tankersley follows a team of doctors as they install one of the world's first electronic spine replacements, dubbed the Neurobridge. The patient is paralyzed from the chest down, but researchers hope the Neurobridge can restore control of his hands. A …

Scientists confirm existence of elusive 117th element

After four years of painstaking research, the discovery of the periodic table's 117th element has been confirmed. Element 117, otherwise known as ununseptium, was originally discovered back in 2010 by a group of American and Russian physicists with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). …

Chemists Expand Nature's Genetic Alphabet

For the first time, scientists have expanded life's genetic alphabet, by inserting two unnatural, man-made "letters" into a bacterium's DNA, and by showing that the cell's machinery can copy them.<p>The advance means that scientists have a new tool for exploring how life encodes information, which …

Phineas Gage neuroscience case: True story of famous frontal lobe patient is better than textbook accounts.

1 From a virtuous foreman to a sociopathic drifter<p>On Sept. 13, 1848, at around 4:30 p.m., the time of day when the mind might start wandering, a …

Fox News Now Classifies Climate Change As "Superstition"

Fox News' "Special Report" took a look at the latest climate-change studies. And even by the network's standards, this segment of …

Stephan’s Quintet. Four galaxies merging into one - Exploring Space

Celgene's spondylitis drug misses main goal in trial | Reuters

(Reuters) - Celgene Corp said a drug being tested to treat a type of arthritis that affects the spine failed to meet the main goal in a late-stage trial, sending the company’s shares down 3 percent premarket.<p>The drug, Otezla, failed to show improvement of at least 20 percent at week 16 when tested …

A case for case report forms in psychology

The replication debate in psychology has been stoked again this week, after Harvard University professor Jason Mitchell posted an essay on his website essentially arguing that replications do more harm than good. I’m not going to critique the essay – neuroskeptic, neuropolarbear, Chris Said and …

How DNA Scissors Can Perform Surgery Directly On Your Genes

These gene-slicers may help tackle HIV, Alzheimer's, and brain cancer.<p>Jay Johnson’s DNA was cut into pieces. Tiny molecular scissors chopped it into slices the cell couldn’t readily repair. The cell did its best at a speedy patch-up job, but the gene was left effectively useless. As the battered …

Sex Change: Algae May Point to Origin of Male-Female Split

An unassuming little alga may hold the secret to how the sexes evolved.<p>A single gene that determines male or female sex in multicellular algae evolved from a more primitive version found in a single-celled ancestor that doesn't have sexes, according to a new study.<p>Many scientists think the sexes in …

Eye-guided wheelchair's forward looking tech; Pepper the 'moody' robot

Scientists in London have developed a system that enables wheelchair users to move around by simply looking in the direction they want to go.<p>Researchers at Imperial College, London say the technology is simple and cheap and could transform the lives of people unable to use their limbs.<p>Two cameras …