Chris Dias

84 Flips | 2 Magazines | 2 Likes | @ChrisDiasGene | Keep up with Chris Dias on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Chris Dias”

Scientists Have Tried First-Ever Gene Editing Directly Inside a Patient's Body

There's no turning back now.<p>In a bold first-of-its-kind experiment, scientists have edited a person's genes directly inside living tissue in an …

Genetics

Choosy Eggs May Pick Sperm for Their Genes, Defying Mendel’s Law

The oldest law of genetics says that gametes combine randomly, but experiments hint that sometimes eggs select sperm actively for their genetic …

Researchers find immune cells help rebuild damaged nerves

Immune cells are normally associated with fighting infection but in a new study, scientists have discovered how they also help the nervous system …

I Got Tired Of People Giving My Camera The Credit For My Photos, So I Bought The Cheapest Camera And Lens I Could Find To Prove Them Wrong

When I began posting my photos online, I started getting comments like ‘wow, you must have a great camera’ or ‘anybody can take photos like these …

Most Autism Cases Can Be Explained by Faulty Genes, New Research Confirms

We understand it better than ever.<p>A fresh look at data from earlier research has reaffirmed what many researchers had thought – autism is primarily …

Fathers pass on four times as many new genetic mutations as mothers – study

Faults in male DNA are a driver for rare childhood diseases, research suggests, with men passing on one new mutation for every eight months of age<p>Children inherit four times as many new mutations from their fathers than their mothers, according to research that suggests faults in the men’s DNA are …

Mutations

‘Vampires’ may have been real people with this blood disorder

Porphyrias, a group of eight known blood disorders, affect the body’s molecular machinery for making heme, which is a component of the …

The science myths that will not die

False beliefs and wishful thinking about the human experience are common. They are hurting people — and holding back science.

Myths

THE ORGANOID ARCHITECT

<b>UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS—</b>By her 50th birthday, Els van der Heijden felt sicker than ever. Born with the hereditary disorder cystic fibrosis (CF), she …

Meditation and yoga can ‘reverse’ DNA reactions which cause stress, new study suggests

Mind-body interventions (MBIs) such as meditation, yoga and Tai Chi don’t simply relax us; they can ‘reverse’ the molecular reactions in our DNA …

Sickle-Cell Patients See Hope in CRISPR - MIT Technology Review

Hertz Nazaire is a soft-spoken artist who likes to paint in bright colors, with subjects like rainbow palm leaves and dancing women in twirling …

If you’re 35 or younger, your genes can predict whether the flu vaccine will work

A set of nine genes predicted an effective response to the flu vaccine in young people, no matter the strains.

Cryptographers and Geneticists Unite to Analyze Genomes They Can’t See

A cryptographer and a geneticist walk into a seminar room. An hour later, after a talk by the cryptographer, the geneticist approaches him with a …

The trickiest family tree in biology

Scientists are striving for a deeper view of development, from embryo to adult, cell-by-cell.

Biology

Untreatable gonorrhoea on the rise worldwide

Non-profit group helps marshal trial of a new antibiotic in an attempt to beat back resistant infections.

Nonprofits

Killing cancer in the heat of the moment

Mineko Kengaku, Tatsuya Murakami, and their colleagues from Kyoto University’s Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) have developed …

Nearly half of China cancer deaths attributable to potentially modifiable risk factors

A new report finds more than half of all cancer deaths in men in 2013 in China and more than a third of those in women were attributable to a group …

Menstruation doesn’t change how your brain works — period

A new study published in <i>Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience</i> today is setting out to change the way we think about the menstrual cycle. While it's …

CRISPR: Emerging applications for genome editing technology

New gene editing tools transform disease models and future therapies<p>CRISPR gene editing is taking biomedical research by storm. Providing the …

The Rule of Thirds: What is it and why does it matter?

The Rule of Thirds is likely a term that you may have heard in reference to photography or videography, or maybe even graphic design or art. But you …

Landscape Photography

Using Big Data to Hack Autism

It’s been 10 years since Michael Wigler had a breakthrough revelation in autism genetics—one that arguably launched the field as we know it.<p>In April …

Scientists Have Uncovered The Atomic Structure of a Key Alzheimer's Protein For The First Time

This is huge.<p>For the first time, scientists have revealed the chemical structure of one of the key markers of Alzheimer's disease, capturing …

Extremely detailed images of living cells can now be taken over time

The new method allows for nanoscale views for tens of minutes at a time.<p>Advanced microscope technology now lets us view objects at the nanoscale, meaning, when it comes to biology, we can see details of living cells that were never possible before. But doing that comes with a few requirements that …

Imaging

Make DNA tests routine, says England's chief medical officer

Sally Davies calls for making genomic testing as common as blood tests to usher in the era of precision medicine to treat cancers and rare diseases<p>Genomic testing should become a normal part of NHS care, beginning with cancer patients and those with rare diseases, says the chief medical officer, …

Fears over a medical gold rush in cancer drug race | Financial Times

It might sound like a strange complaint against an industry often accused of scrimping on research to fund marketing efforts, but some executives and …

Scientists are dusting off a long-forgotten weapon to cope with modern bacteria

By Marlene Cimons<p>In 1915, British scientist Frederick Twort saw something weird happening to the bacteria that had invaded his viral cultures: They were disappearing, a sign they had been destroyed. Two years later, French-Canadian microbiologist Félix d’ Hérelle observed the same phenomenon in his …

San Diego

Low-risk breast cancer patients could be spared chemotherapy with new test

Thousands of breast cancer patients could be spared chemotherapy after scientists developed a new test which shows if the disease is likely to return.<p>The test, called MammaPrint, was designed by the University of California and looks for 70 gene variants in blood or saliva which are known to …

Jennifer Doudna: ‘I have to be true to who I am as a scientist’

Crispr inventor Jennifer Doudna talks about discovering the gene-editing tool, the split with her collaborator and the complex ethics of genetic manipulation<p>Jennifer Doudna, 53, is an American biochemist based at the University of California, Berkeley. Together with the French microbiologist …

Genetics

This Is The First Detailed Footage of DNA Replication, And It Wasn't What We Expected

"It undermines a great deal of what's in the textbooks."<p>Here's proof of how far we've come in science - in June 2017, researchers recorded up-close …