Bob Scheidt

112 Flips | 1 Magazine | 1 Like | 8 Following | 18 Followers | @BobScheidt | I like to take internal mind excursions + extetnal body excursions whether i am at home reading or actually traveling. All these things feed my spirt.

Walt Whitman on What Makes Life Worth Living

“Tone your wants and tastes low down enough, and make much of negatives, and of mere daylight and the skies.”<p><i>“Do you need a prod?”</i> the poet Mary Oliver asked in her sublime meditation on living with maximal aliveness. <i>“Do you need a little darkness to get you going?”</i> A paralytic prod descended upon</b> …

Trailblazing Astronomer Maria Mitchell on How We Co-Create Each Other and Recreate Ourselves Through Friendship

“Whatever our degree of friends may be, we come more under their influence than we are aware.”<p><i>“We can count on so few people to go that hard way with us,”</i> Adrienne Rich wrote in her exquisite meditation on the art of honorable human relationships. While it is hard enough to inoculate the integrity …

An Alternative View of Human Nature: Rebecca Solnit on Disaster as a Catalyst for Dignity, Agency, and Human Goodness

“The constellations of solidarity, altruism, and improvisation are within most of us and reappear at these times.”<p>In his diary of moral development, young Tolstoy proclaimed: <i>“This is the entire essence of life: Who are you? What are you?”</i> The part left unspoken, perhaps because it is often …

Into the Chute of Time: Annie Dillard on the Stunning Otherworldliness of a Total Solar Eclipse

“What you see in a total eclipse is entirely different from what you know.”<p><i>“A writer is someone who pays attention to the world — a writer is a professional observer,”</i> Susan Sontag wrote in contemplating the project of literature. Often, the measure of a writer is the attentiveness with which they …

America hits peak anti-intellectualism: Majority of Republicans now think college is bad

<b>(AP/Steven Senne/Getty/Molly Riley)</b><p>Republicans say no to college: It’s the only institution viewed in more sharply partisan terms than the media<p>Sophia Tesfaye<p>July 11, 2017 8:58am (UTC)<p>Has America hit peak anti-intellectualism?<p>Aside from the election of Donald Trump, a businessman born into wealth …

Chuck Grassley

Does CGM Benefit Injection Users? Yes! Results from Dexcom’s DIaMonD Study

<i>Significant Improvement in A1c and time-in-range when adding CGM.</i>Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is often considered a technology for insulin …

Diabetes

A New Refutation of Time: Borges on the Most Paradoxical Dimension of Existence

“Time is the substance I am made of. Time is a river which sweeps me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger which destroys me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire which consumes me, but I am the fire.”<p><i>“If our heart were large enough to love life in all its detail, we would see that every instant is</i> …

Werner Herzog Recommends Five Books Every Aspiring Filmmaker Should Read

From Virgil to JFK’s assassination report, an eclectic fomenting of the cinematic imagination.<p><i>“Filmmaking — like great literature — must have experience of life at its foundation,”</i> <b>Werner Herzog</b> counseled in his no-nonsense advice to aspiring filmmakers. But a robust and wide-ranging foundation of …

Literature

Jorge Luis Borges on Collective Tragedy and Collective Joy

“There was the emotion over what had occurred, and there was also the emotion of knowing that thousands of people, millions of people, maybe all the people in the world, were feeling great emotion over what was occurring.”<p><i>“This must be the mission of every man of goodwill: to insist, unflaggingly,</i> …

The 10 best Werner Herzog documentaries

Director Werner Herzog is a mini-celebrity these days—he’s read his own version of <i>Go the Fuck to Sleep</i> for hipster parents, and he’s even been a …

​Why Do People Keep Trying to Visit the ‘Into the Wild’ Bus?

Every year, travelers take to the Stampede Trail in search of some kind of survivalist nirvana. And every year, people have to be rescued along the way.<p>When Eddie Habeck booked a hiking and trail-running excursion through Alaska in 2012, he wasn't planning to visit Fairbanks Bus 142. The …

Hermann Hesse on the Three Types of Readers and Why the Most Transcendent Form of Reading Is Non-reading

“At the hour when our imagination and our ability to associate are at their height, we really no longer read what is printed on the paper but swim in a stream of impulses and inspirations that reach us from what we are reading.”<p>Categories are how we navigate the world, for better or for worse — …

Why This Christian Studies Islam

People often ask me, "Why do you study Islam if you are a Christian?"<p>Here is my answer:<p>I am hungry for meaning, wherever it might be found. I do not care if it is in a desert of Arabia or a small village in France. I want to bridge the perceived worlds, through meaning-making. I want to find the …

I’m Having a Long-Distance Love Affair — But It’s Not What You Think

<i>This story originally appeared on InStyle.com.</i><p>While most women my age are concerned with finding “the one” and settling down, I’m hoping to …

Addicted To One God

It's mind blowing to me that for so, so long the notion of one single god has absolutely dominated our spiritual imagination and moral intelligence, especially in the west.<p>I find the notion of infinite gods and goddesses - rather than one immense all-encompassing God or Goddess - far more …

Healthcare and the Human Spirit: Walt Whitman on the Most Important Priority in Healing the Body and the Soul

“There is something in personal love, caresses, and the magnetic flood of sympathy and friendship, that does, in its way, more good than all the medicine in the world.”<p>In the early 1860s, six years after he self-published <i>Leaves of Grass</i>, <b>Walt Whitman</b> (May 31, 1819–March 26, 1892) began volunteering …

The Philosopher’s Library (Part 2)

[Simone de Beauvoire without shelves]The philosophers of the <i>End Times</i> series recommended books to readers to get further into their philosophical …

Philosophy

André Gide on Growing Happier as We Grow Older and Using Death as a Mobilizing Force for Creative Work

“Age cannot manage to empty either sensual pleasure of its attractiveness or the whole world of its charm.”<p><i>“There is, after all, something eternal that lies beyond the hand of fate and of all human delusions,”</i> Albert Einstein wrote in his beautiful letter to the Queen of Belgium, <i>“and such eternals</i> …

George Eliot

Letter to Borges: Susan Sontag on Books, Self-Transcendence, and Reading in the Age of Screens

In October of 1982, 83-year-old Jorge Luis Borges, who at that point had been blind for nearly 30 years, gathered sixty of his closest friends and admirers at a special dinner in New York. Susan Sontag was there. Speaking to a reporter covering the event, she captured the enormity of Borges’s …

J.R.R. Tolkien Reads from The Lord of the Rings and Sings “Sam’s Rhyme of the Troll” in a Rare Recording

“One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them…”<p>In the summer of 1952, sixty-year-old <b>J.R.R. Tolkien</b> (January 3, 1892–September 2, 1973) encountered a tape recorder for the first time, which resulted in some wonderful archival audio of the …

16 Elevating Resolutions for 2016 Inspired by Some of Humanity’s Greatest Minds

Cultivate honorable relationships, resist absentminded busyness, tell the world how to treat you, embrace enoughness, and more.<p>What if we could augment the bucket-list of typical New Year’s resolutions, dominated by bodily habits and pragmatic daily practices, with higher-order aspirations — habits …

Literature

Thomas Wolfe on Ambition, Gratitude, and the True Measure of Success, in Letters to His Mother

“It is not all bad, but it is not all good, it is not all ugly, but it is not all beautiful, it is life, life, life — the only thing that matters.”<p><i>“Does what goes on inside show on the outside?”</i> Van Gogh wrote to his brother in contemplating how ambition is transmuted into art, adding wistfully:</i> …

Literature

The Outsider with the Public Voice: How Joan Didion Mirrored Us Back to Ourselves

“From the first, her work insisted that a single life contained the life of our times.”<p><i>“Character — the willingness to accept responsibility for one’s own life — is the source from which self-respect springs,”</i> Joan Didion wrote in one of the early masterworks that turned her, over the course of the …

The Secret History of One Hundred Years of Solitude

A half-century ago, Gabriel García Márquez, after yet another visit to the pawnshop, sent his now signature novel to his publisher. As Solitude turns 50, Paul Elie interviews Gabo’s longtime agent—just weeks before her death, at 85—and discovers the events that led to a literary revelation.<p>The …

9 Learnings from 9 Years of Brain Pickings

Reflections on the rewards of seeking out what magnifies your spirit.<p>On October 23, 2006, <i>Brain Pickings</i> was born as an email to my seven colleagues at one of the four jobs I held while paying my way through college. Over the years that followed, the short weekly email became a tiny website updated …

Creativity

Sylvia Plath on Privilege, Free Will, and What Makes Us Who We Are

“I: how firm a letter; how reassuring the three strokes: one vertical, proud and assertive, and then the two short horizontal lines in quick, smug succession.”<p>One of our our basic human biases is the tendency to take credit for our successes as a function of our personal excellence and to attribute …

Literature

The Great French Artist Eugène Delacroix on Self-Doubt, Idea-Ambivalence, and the Cure for Procrastination

“I must never put off for a better day something that I could enjoy doing now.”<p><i>“The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy, which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today,”</i> Seneca wrote in contemplating the shortness of life and the art of living with immediacy. Our propensity for procrastination is …

David Foster Wallace on Why You Should Use a Dictionary, How to Write a Great Opener, and the Measure of Good Writing

“Really good writing [is] able to get across massive amounts of information and various favorable impressions of the communicator with minimal effort on the part of the reader.”<p><i>“Readers who want to become writers should read with a dictionary at hand,”</i> Harvard psycholinguist Steven Pinker asserted …

Nicole Krauss’s Beautiful Letter to Van Gogh on Fear, Bravery, and How to Break the Loop of Our Destructive Patterns

“Bravery is always more intelligent than fear, since it is built on the foundation of what one knows about oneself: the knowledge of one’s strength and capacity, of one’s passion.”<p><i>“Feeling helpless and confused in the face of random, unpatterned events, we seek to order them and, in so doing, gain</i> …