Salesforce vs. Twitter in San Francisco homeless tax fight

In this Oct. 1, 2018 photo, Stormy Nichole Day, left, sits on a sidewalk on Haight Street with Nord (last name not given) and his dog Hobo while interviewed about being homeless in San Francisco. A measure on San Francisco's Nov. 6 ballot would levy an extra tax on hundreds of the city's wealthiest companies to raise $300 million for homelessness and mental health services. It's the latest battle between big business and social services advocates who say that companies such as Amazon, Google and Salesforce can afford to help solve severe inequities caused by business success. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
In this Oct. 1, 2018 photo, Stormy Nichole Day, left, sits on a sidewalk on Haight Street with Nord (last name not given) and his dog Hobo while interviewed about being homeless in San Francisco. A measure on San Francisco's Nov. 6 ballot would levy an extra tax on hundreds of the city's wealthiest companies to raise $300 million for homelessness and mental health services. It's the latest battle between big business and social services advocates who say that companies such as Amazon, Google and Salesforce can afford to help solve severe inequities caused by business success. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2018, San Francisco native Tracey Mixon stands on a street in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco. Mixon, 47, and her daughter were recently evicted from their two-bedroom home. She hopes San Francisco voters will approve Proposition C on the Nov. 6 ballot, which would levy an extra tax on some businesses to raise $300 million a year for homelessness and mental health services. (AP Photo/Janie Har)
In this photo taken Oct. 5, 2018, San Francisco native Tracey Mixon stands on a street in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco. Mixon, 47, and her daughter were recently evicted from their two-bedroom home. She hopes San Francisco voters will approve Proposition C on the Nov. 6 ballot, which would levy an extra tax on some businesses to raise $300 million a year for homelessness and mental health services. (AP Photo/Janie Har)
In this Oct. 1, 2018 photo, Sunshine Powers, owner of the store Love on Haight, right, hugs Christin Evans, owner of The Booksmith, outside of Powers' store in San Francisco. A measure on San Francisco's Nov. 6 ballot would levy an extra tax on hundreds of the city's wealthiest companies to raise $300 million for homelessness and mental health services. It's the latest battle between big business and social services advocates who say that companies such as Amazon, Google and Salesforce can afford to help solve severe inequities caused by business success. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
In this Oct. 1, 2018 photo, Sunshine Powers, owner of the store Love on Haight, right, hugs Christin Evans, owner of The Booksmith, outside of Powers' store in San Francisco. A measure on San Francisco's Nov. 6 ballot would levy an extra tax on hundreds of the city's wealthiest companies to raise $300 million for homelessness and mental health services. It's the latest battle between big business and social services advocates who say that companies such as Amazon, Google and Salesforce can afford to help solve severe inequities caused by business success. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
In this Oct. 1, 2018 photo, Christin Evans, owner of The Booksmith, carries her dog Joey Pistachio as she crosses Ashbury Street along Haight Street in San Francisco. A measure on San Francisco's Nov. 6 ballot would levy an extra tax on hundreds of the city's wealthiest companies to raise $300 million for homelessness and mental health services. It's the latest battle between big business and social services advocates who say that companies such as Amazon, Google and Salesforce can afford to help solve severe inequities caused by business success. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
In this Oct. 1, 2018 photo, Christin Evans, owner of The Booksmith, carries her dog Joey Pistachio as she crosses Ashbury Street along Haight Street in San Francisco. A measure on San Francisco's Nov. 6 ballot would levy an extra tax on hundreds of the city's wealthiest companies to raise $300 million for homelessness and mental health services. It's the latest battle between big business and social services advocates who say that companies such as Amazon, Google and Salesforce can afford to help solve severe inequities caused by business success. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)