I owe how much? Americans shocked by impact of new tax law

Husband and wife Andy Kraft and Amy Elias, of Portland, Ore., pose with their 2018 tax paperwork in their Portland home on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. The couple got a small refund last year but this year owe more than $10,000 in taxes under the new tax law. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
Husband and wife Andy Kraft and Amy Elias, of Portland, Ore., pose with their 2018 tax paperwork in their Portland home on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. The couple got a small refund last year but this year owe more than $10,000 in taxes under the new tax law. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
Husband and wife Andy Kraft and Amy Elias, of Portland, Ore., talk during an interview about their 2018 tax paperwork in their Portland home on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. The couple got a small refund last year but this year owe more than $10,000 in taxes under the new tax law. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
Husband and wife Andy Kraft and Amy Elias, of Portland, Ore., talk during an interview about their 2018 tax paperwork in their Portland home on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. The couple got a small refund last year but this year owe more than $10,000 in taxes under the new tax law. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
In this Friday, Feb. 15, 2019, photo Kevin McCreanor works on a laptop near paperwork in Atlanta. The first tax filing season under the new federal tax law is proving to be surprising, confusing (and occasionally frightening) for some Americans. McCreanor and his wife normally get a sizeable refund each year. While they know waiting for a large refund isn't the best strategy financially, they like a refund and they put anything they get back toward their daughters' education. Their income, earned primarily from his wife's job in telecom, can vary greatly, so there was comfort in never facing a big bill. (AP Photo/Cody Jackson)
In this Friday, Feb. 15, 2019, photo Kevin McCreanor works on a laptop near paperwork in Atlanta. The first tax filing season under the new federal tax law is proving to be surprising, confusing (and occasionally frightening) for some Americans. McCreanor and his wife normally get a sizeable refund each year. While they know waiting for a large refund isn't the best strategy financially, they like a refund and they put anything they get back toward their daughters' education. Their income, earned primarily from his wife's job in telecom, can vary greatly, so there was comfort in never facing a big bill. (AP Photo/Cody Jackson)
In this Friday, Feb. 15, 2019, photo Kevin McCreanor works on a laptop in Atlanta. The first tax filing season under the new federal tax law is proving to be surprising, confusing (and occasionally frightening) for some Americans. McCreanor and his wife normally get a sizeable refund each year. While they know waiting for a large refund isn't the best strategy financially, they like a refund and they put anything they get back toward their daughters' education. Their income, earned primarily from his wife's job in telecom, can vary greatly, so there was comfort in never facing a big bill. (AP Photo/Cody Jackson)
In this Friday, Feb. 15, 2019, photo Kevin McCreanor works on a laptop in Atlanta. The first tax filing season under the new federal tax law is proving to be surprising, confusing (and occasionally frightening) for some Americans. McCreanor and his wife normally get a sizeable refund each year. While they know waiting for a large refund isn't the best strategy financially, they like a refund and they put anything they get back toward their daughters' education. Their income, earned primarily from his wife's job in telecom, can vary greatly, so there was comfort in never facing a big bill. (AP Photo/Cody Jackson)
In this Friday, Feb. 15, 2019, photo Kevin McCreanor works on a laptop in Atlanta. The first tax filing season under the new federal tax law is proving to be surprising, confusing (and occasionally frightening) for some Americans. McCreanor and his wife normally get a sizeable refund each year. While they know waiting for a large refund isn't the best strategy financially, they like a refund and they put anything they get back toward their daughters' education. Their income, earned primarily from his wife's job in telecom, can vary greatly, so there was comfort in never facing a big bill. (AP Photo/Cody Jackson)
In this Friday, Feb. 15, 2019, photo Kevin McCreanor works on a laptop in Atlanta. The first tax filing season under the new federal tax law is proving to be surprising, confusing (and occasionally frightening) for some Americans. McCreanor and his wife normally get a sizeable refund each year. While they know waiting for a large refund isn't the best strategy financially, they like a refund and they put anything they get back toward their daughters' education. Their income, earned primarily from his wife's job in telecom, can vary greatly, so there was comfort in never facing a big bill. (AP Photo/Cody Jackson)