Ray

610 Added | 2 Magazines | 2 Followers | @ArcaniX | Future Bioengineer - Transhumanist

Internet filters blocking one in five most-popular websites

Jezebel and Guido Fawkes sites among those blocked by at least one mobile or fixed line service provider in UK, campaigners say<p>Nearly one in five of the most visited sites on the internet are being blocked by the adult content filters installed on Britain's broadband and mobile networks.<p>A Porsche …

So What If It's Ugly? It Just Keeps On Going ...

Far, far, far away is a great place to be — if you want to stay marvelous. There is a plant, called <i>Welwitschia mirabilis</i> (mirabilis being Latin for marvelous), found only one place on Earth. You can get there, as artist/photographer Rachel Sussman did, by driving through the vast emptiness of the …

Why Those Tiny Microbeads In Soap May Pose Problem For Great Lakes

From the shoreline at North Avenue Beach in Chicago, the blue water of Lake Michigan stretches as far as the eye can see. But beneath that pristine image, there's a barely visible threat, says Jennifer Caddick of the Alliance for the Great Lakes: microbeads.<p>These tiny bits of plastic, small …

Unlike us, chickens regrow lost hearing cells - Futurity

New understanding of how chickens regrow sound-detecting cells could lead to better treatments for hearing loss in humans, say researchers.

Tiny algae 'compartments' might speed up photosynthesis - Futurity

Genes from blue-green algae could offer a way to boost crop yields in plants by making photosynthesis more efficient.

Mice Run on Wheel for Fun, Study Finds

Mice just want to have fun. New research shows that when an exercise wheel sits in a forest, mice will voluntarily run on it.<p>Scientists say this …

University of Colorado

New Study Strengthens Gut Bacteria-Autism Link

New research adds more strength to the potential link between gut bacteria and autism.<p>In a small study, researchers from Arizona State University found evidence that gut bacteria may differ between children with and without autism.<p>Specifically, the researchers found that the fecal concentrations of …

A Tiny Rabbit Pacemaker That Charges Wirelessly

The technique could soon power implants in humans.<p>Scientists have implanted a tiny pacemaker in a rabbit and wirelessly powered it to regulate the animal's heart beat. It's the first time such a device has been powered this way in a living animal, suggesting that the same technique could run …

Stanford University

Car Windshield Cleaning Fluid Carries Deadly Legionnaires' Bacteria

Although most people exposed do not get sick.<p>That which cleans your windshield is not exactly clean itself: A new study found that windshield washing fluid can harbor the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease, a severe type of pneumonia that hospitalizes as many as 18,000 Americans every year. …

Found: First U.S. Patient To Get MERS Without Traveling To The Middle East

The man contracted the virus from close contact with a healthcare worker who worked in Saudi Arabia. The virus is new and can be deadly, but the man is doing well and is not contagious.<p>After officials found the U.S.'s first case of the deadly virus MERS, they began tracking down everybody who had …

Matter will be created from light within a year, claim scientists

In a neat demonstration of E=mc2, physicists believe they can create electrons and positrons from colliding photons<p>Researchers have worked out how to make matter from pure light and are drawing up plans to demonstrate the feat within the next 12 months.<p>The theory underpinning the idea was first …

Ageing: The girls who never grow older

A handful of girls seem to defy one of the biggest certainties in life: ageing. Virginia Hughes reports on the families wrestling with a condition they can’t explain, and the scientist who believes that these children could hold the key to immortality.<p>Richard Walker has been trying to conquer …

Vietnam War

Hard to swallow: the world's first drinkable sunscreen

Yesterday, the Telegraph and the Mail ran stories about the world’s first drinkable sunscreen. To say the product described deviates from accepted science would be an understatement. Imagine you programme your sat nav to take you to central London, but instead it directs you to one of Neptune's …

Beezin' May Be Bogus, But Other Dopey Teen Fads Can Bite Back

Another month, another apocalyptic news report of some weird substance that kids are abusing in pursuit of a high.<p>The most recent example is "beezin'," which supposedly involves smearing Burt's Bee's lip balm on one's eyelids. The tingling allegedly heightens the sensation of being drunk or high, …

Research Project Cider Brings iOS Apps to Android Devices

Six PhD students at Columbia University‘s Department of Computer Science have developed Cider, an OS compatibility architecture capable of running iOS apps on Android. Rather than using a strict virtual machine, they achieved the feat by running domestic and foreign binaries on the same device.<p>They …

Internet giants call on US government to keep web democratic

Google, Facebook and Twitter, as well as dozens of other influential technology businesses, have written an open letter to the US government criticising proposed legislation that would undermine the democratic nature of the internet<p>A group of internet giants including <b>Google</b>, <b>Facebook</b> and <b>Twitter</b> have …

Hurricanes May Threaten Cities Like Never Before as Tropics Expand, Study Finds

Hurricanes and tropical storms are reaching their peak intensity closer to the poles, migrating at about 30 miles per decade, according to a new …

Scientists create 'alien' life form with artificial genetic code

For the first time, researchers create a new organism based on E. coli that passes along artificially engineered DNA.<p>Scientists made a substantial breakthrough in understanding how to alter the fundamental nature of life, and they did so by creating for the first time a partially artificial life …

Genetics

Apples of Eden: Saving the Wild Ancestor of Modern Apples

The original apples still grow in Central Asia, but are threatened with extinction.<p><b>This story is part of National Geographic's special eight-month Future of Food series.</b><p><b>An epiphany came to Adrian Newton in the form of an afternoon tea. In 2009, the British forest conservation ecologist was</b> …

Boycotting Tar Sands Oil: Will It Work?

Plans to pressure companies to change their fuel purchasing can be tough to execute.<p>What if you could choose where your fuel comes from?<p><b>In the United States, crude oil that is refined into gasoline comes from many sources: Mexico, Venezuela, and Saudi Arabia all supply the American market, along</b> …

Star clusters form from outside in, not inside out, study says

Astronomers studied two clusters where sun-like stars are still forming. Both clusters had older stars on their outskirts than toward their …

Universe

Don’t shut the door on the synthetic biology debate

A panel of world scientists want to talk to us about synthetic biology. But it's not clear what we're allowed to discuss<p>The Inter-Academy Panel, a network of the world’s science academies including our own Royal Society, today issued a statement on synthetic biology. A few years ago, biologists in …

First life forms to pass on artificial DNA engineered by US scientists

Organisms carrying beefed-up DNA code could be designed to churn out new drugs that could not otherwise be made<p>The first living organism to carry and pass down to future generations an expanded genetic code has been created by American scientists, paving the way for a host of new life forms whose …

Hate Chrome hiding Web addresses? It may be the future

Some loathe Google's test to see whether it's better to hide the gory details of Web addresses by default. But that move could actually be a sensible shift.<p>Get ready for the disappearance of an aspect of Web browsing that's been there since browsers were invented: an address bar that shows the full …

Software

How to win at rock-paper-scissors

Study reveals there is a winning strategy to the simple playground game<p>A study into the popular game rock-paper-scissors has discovered the best strategy to win the game.<p>A group of mathematicians in China showed that while the strategy of players looks random, it actually consists of predictable …

The bacteria that chat back and tell you how they are

Do you speak bacteria? The first conversations with microbes are already under way.<p>Manuel Porcar at the University of Valencia in Spain and his …

E.coli

The New DNA Test That Could Replace Pap Smears

The concept for Pap smears has been around for almost 100 years. Now a new test could replace it as a first-line screen for cervical cancer, but not everyone agrees that's a good idea.<p>There's a new, high-tech alternative to the Pap smear, the cervical swab-based test that women are supposed to get …

Cancer

Liar! Liar! African bird uses elaborate ruse to steal food | Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - If you believe honesty is the best policy, you would have a hard time convincing the forked-tailed drongo. This tricky African bird is the pathological liar of the animal kingdom.<p>Forked-tail drongo is shown perched in Kuruman River Reserve in South Africa in 2008 in this …

Study turns skin tissue from infertile men into early-stage sperm cells

Researchers at Stanford convert skin cells into stem cells, which became human sperm cells when transplanted into mice's testes<p>Scientists have turned skin tissue from infertile men into early-stage sperm cells in a groundbreaking study that raises hopes for new therapies for the condition.<p>The …

Fatal Superbugs: Antibiotics Losing Effectiveness, WHO Says

"Genetics is working against us, almost like a science-fiction story."<p>The spread of superbugs—bacteria that have changed in ways that render antibiotics ineffective against them—is a serious and growing threat around the world, according to the World Health Organization's first global report on …