Adrian Bica

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Paris Review - Umberto Eco, The Art of Fiction No. 197

Interviewed by Lila Azam Zanganeh<p>Issue 185, Summer 2008<p>The first time I called Umberto Eco, he was sitting at his desk in his seventeenth-century manor in the hills outside Urbino, near the Adriatic coast of Italy. He sang the virtues of his <i>bellissima</i> swimming pool, but suspected I might have …

Paris Review - Italo Calvino, The Art of Fiction No. 130

Interviewed by William Weaver, Damien Pettigrew<p>Issue 124, Fall 1992<p>Upon hearing of Italo Calvino’s death in September of 1985, John Updike commented, “Calvino was a genial as well as brilliant writer. He took fiction into new places where it had never been before, and back into the fabulous and …

Paris Review - Guillermo Cabrera Infante, The Art of Fiction No. 75

Interviewed by Alfred Mac Adam<p>Issue 87, Spring 1983<p>Miriam Gomez and Guillermo Cabrera Infante by Nestor Almendros<p>Guillermo Cabrera Infante was born on April 22, 1929, in Gibara, a small town on the northern coast of the Cuban province of Oriente—also the birthplace of Fulgencio Batista and Fidel …

Paris Review - Edward Albee, The Art of Theater No. 4

Interviewed by William Flanagan<p>Issue 39, Fall 1966<p>Edward Albee. Photo by Monica Simoes.<p>The interview happened on a scalding, soggy-aired Fourth of July in a sunny room in Albee’s small, attractive country house in Montauk, Long Island. Keeping in mind his luxuriously appointed house in New York …

Paris Review - Haruki Murakami, The Art of Fiction No. 182

Interviewed by John Wray<p>Issue 170, Summer 2004<p>The author at his jazz club, Peter Cat, in 1978.<p>Haruki Murakami is not only arguably the most experimental Japanese novelist to have been translated into English, he is also the most popular, with sales in the millions worldwide. His greatest novels …

Paris Review - Gabriel García Márquez, The Art of Fiction No. 69

Interviewed by Peter H. Stone<p>Issue 82, Winter 1981<p>Gabriel García Márquez was interviewed in his studio/office located just behind his house in San Angel Inn, an old and lovely section, full of the spectacularly colorful flowers of Mexico City. The studio is a short walk from the main house. A low …

Iris Murdoch's Favorite Painting, "The Flaying of Marsyas"

By Dan Piepenbring July 15, 2015<p>Look<p>Titian, <i>The Flaying of Marsyas</i>, ca. 1570–76, oil on canvas, 83″ × 81″.<p>Iris Murdoch, who would be ninety-six today, thrilled to paintings of every stripe, but she was compelled by one work in particular: Titian’s <i>The Flaying of Marsyas</i>, from the late sixteenth …

Paris Review - Orhan Pamuk, The Art of Fiction No. 187

Interviewed by Ángel Gurrí­a-Quintana<p>Issue 175, Fall/Winter 2005<p>Pamuk in 1996.<p>Orhan Pamuk was born in 1952 in Istanbul, where he continues to live. His family had made a fortune in railroad construction during the early days of the Turkish Republic and Pamuk attended Robert College, where the …

Paris Review - Jack Kerouac, The Art of Fiction No. 41

Interviewed by Ted Berrigan<p>Issue 43, Summer 1968<p>Jack Kerouac, ca. 1956. Photograph by Tom Palumbo<p>The Kerouacs have no telephone. Ted Berrigan had contacted Kerouac some months earlier and had persuaded him to do the interview. When he felt the time had come for their meeting to take place, he …

Literature

Paris Review - Vladimir Nabokov, The Art of Fiction No. 40

Interviewed by Herbert Gold<p>Issue 41, Summer-Fall 1967<p>Vladimir Nabokov in 1967.<p>Vladimir Nabokov lives with his wife Véra in the Montreux Palace Hotel in Montreux, Switzerland, a resort city on Lake Geneva which was a favorite of Russian aristocrats of the last century. They dwell in a connected …

Paris Review - Louis-Ferdinand Céline, The Art of Fiction No. 33

Interviewed by Jacques Darribehaude and Jean Geunot<p>Issue 31, Winter-Spring 1964<p>Louis-Ferdinand Céline, ca. 1932.<p>LOUIS-FERDINAND CÉLINE<p>So what can I say to you? I don’t know how to please your readers. Those’re people with whom you’ve got to be gentle … You can’t beat them up. They like us to amuse …

Paris Review - Truman Capote, The Art of Fiction No. 17

Interviewed by Pati Hill<p>Issue 16, Spring-Summer 1957<p>Sketch by Rosalie Seidler, 1957.<p>Truman Capote lives in a big yellow house in Brooklyn Heights, which he has recently restored with the taste and elegance that is generally characteristic of his undertakings. As I entered he was head and shoulders …

Literature

The Borges Memorial Library: A Brief Survey of Imaginary Books

By Seth Gannon March 24, 2016<p><i>A brief survey of fictional books.</i><p>Erik Desmazières, <i>Library of Babel</i>.<p>I’m soon to move across the country, and surveying my bookcases—the three in the living room and the three in the bedroom, plus the unshelved piles that crop up from any flat surface—fills me with …

Paris Review - Julian Barnes, The Art of Fiction No. 165

Interviewed by Shusha Guppy<p>Issue 157, Winter 2000<p>Photograph by Ellen Warner<p>Julian Barnes lives with his wife Pat Kavanagh, a literary agent, in an elegant house with a beautiful garden in north London. The long library where the interview was conducted is spacious and quiet. Overlooking the garden, …

Paris Review - Iris Murdoch, The Art of Fiction No. 117

Interviewed by Jeffrey Meyers<p>Issue 115, Summer 1990<p>Iris Murdoch was born in Dublin on July 15, 1919 and grew up in London. She was educated at Badminton School in Bristol and studied classics at Somerville College, Oxford from 1938 until 1942, receiving first-class honors. She was assistant …

Paris Review - Kurt Vonnegut, The Art of Fiction No. 64

Interviewed by David Hayman, David Michaelis, George Plimpton, Richard Rhodes<p>Issue 69, Spring 1977<p>Kurt Vonnegut, ca. 1972. Photograph by PBS<p>This interview with Kurt Vonnegut was originally a composite of four interviews done with the author over the past decade. The composite has gone through an …

Paris Review - Aldous Huxley, The Art of Fiction No. 24

Interviewed by Raymond Fraser, George Wickes<p>Issue 23, Spring 1960<p>Drawing by Paul Darrow.<p>Among serious novelists, Aldous Huxley is surely the wittiest and most irreverent. Ever since the early twenties, his name has been a byword for a particular kind of social satire; in fact, he has immortalized …

Paris Review - Paul Auster, The Art of Fiction No. 178

Interviewed by Michael Wood<p>Issue 167, Fall 2003<p>In 1985, after seventeen New York publishers had rejected <i>City of Glass</i>, the lead novella in The New York Trilogy, it was published by Sun and Moon Press in San Francisco. The other two novellas, <i>Ghosts</i> and <i>The Locked Room</i>, came out the next year. Paul …

Literature

Paris Review - Carlos Fuentes, The Art of Fiction No. 68

Interviewed by Alfred Mac Adam, Charles E. Ruas<p>Issue 82, Winter 1981<p>Carlos Fuentes was interviewed on a snowy December day at his home in Princeton, New Jersey—a large Victorian house in the old residential section. He is a tall, heavyset man, dressed on that winter's day in a turtleneck sweater …

Paris Review - Ismail Kadare, The Art of Fiction No. 153

Interviewed by Shusha Guppy<p>Issue 147, Summer 1998<p>In 1970 a novel by an unknown Albanian writer took literary Paris by storm. <i>The General of the Dead Army</i> was the story of an Italian general who goes back to Albania after the Second World War to find the bodies of the Italian soldiers killed there …

Paris Review - Naguib Mahfouz, The Art of Fiction No. 129

Interviewed by Charlotte El Shabrawy<p>Issue 123, Summer 1992<p>Naguib Mahfouz credits Hafiz Najib—thief, jailbird, renowned cop baiter and author of twenty-two detective novels—with being his earliest literary influence. The ten-year-old Mahfouz read Najib’s <i>Johnson’s Son</i> on the recommendation of an …

Kafka on the Shore review – Murakami’s novel becomes a sensuous spectacle

<b>Barbican, London</b><br>Giant plastic cubes glide around the stage, bringing to life a dream world of Hegel-quoting sex-workers and a cat-seeking holy fool<p>The great Japanese director Yukio Ninagawa, now 79, has given us some memorable productions over the years. But even by his standards, this version of …

Want to discuss cats or novels? Haruki Murakami will answer

TOKYO (AP) — If you are troubled, lost in life or just feel like discussing cats and Japanese baseball, visit "Mr. Murakami's Place" online. Starting …

Paris Review - William Faulkner, The Art of Fiction No. 12

Interviewed by Jean Stein<p>Issue 12, Spring 1956<p>Mr. Faulkner’s self portrait, 1956.<p>William Faulkner was born in 1897 in New Albany, Mississippi, where his father was then working as a conductor on the railroad built by the novelist’s great-grandfather, Colonel William Falkner (without the “u”), …

Paris Review - Anthony Burgess, The Art of Fiction No. 48

Interviewed by John Cullinan<p>Issue 56, Spring 1973<p>Much of the interview was conducted through an exchange of letters from June 1971 until the summer of 1972. On December 2, 1972, a portion of the interview was taped at the Center for Twentieth Century Studies of the University of Wisconsin. …

Paris Review - John Irving, The Art of Fiction No. 93

Interviewed by Ron Hansen<p>Issue 100, Summer-Fall 1986<p>John Irving, ca. 2010. Photograph by Jost Hindersmann<p>John Irving was interviewed in the cramped back room of his otherwise large and luxurious apartment in Manhattan. A jump rope hangs on the door, a heavy set of weights “is always in the way” on …

Literature

Paris Review - Salman Rushdie, The Art of Fiction No. 186

Interviewed by Jack Livings<p>Issue 174, Summer 2005<p>Salman Rushdie as a boy in Bombay.<p>Salman Rushdie was born in Bombay in 1947, on the eve of India’s independence. He was educated there and in England, where he spent the first decades of his writing life. These days Rushdie lives primarily in New …

Paris Review - Julio Cortázar, The Art of Fiction No. 83

Interviewed by Jason Weiss<p>Issue 93, Fall 1984<p>When Julio Cortázar died of cancer in February 1984 at the age of sixty-nine, the Madrid newspaper <i>El Pais</i> hailed him as one of Latin America’s greatest writers and over two days carried eleven full pages of tributes, reminiscences, and farewells.<p>Though …

William Faulkner Draws Maps of Yoknapatawpha County, the Fictional Home of His Great Novels

If you’ve ever had difficulty pronouncing the word Yoknapatawpha—the fictional Mississippi county where William Faulkner set his best-known …

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao declared 21st century’s best novel so far

Junot Díaz’s mix of ‘history, comics, sci-fi, and magic realism ‘ tops BBC Culture poll of US critics on the best fiction since 2000<p>A group of American critics has named Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, an ingenious take on the life of an overweight Dominican-American nerd, as the …