1843 Magazine

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These streets weren’t made for walking

Pavements in South-East Asia are full of people. But they are not for pedestrians<p>Planning an evening walk through Yangon, the largest city in …

Urban Design

Shirt tales

More than mere garments, T-shirts have been vehicles for protest and self-promotion since the 1930s. A new exhibition explores their surprising …

Jimi Hendrix

The gardener of Aden

How a strange passion for topiary is flourishing in the land of al-Qaeda<p>It began two years ago with a few snips to a Damas bush. Before the week was …

Middle East

What Georgians make of “The Death of Stalin”

An irreverent film about their most infamous export is proving popular<p>There are two great compliments that have been paid to “The Death of Stalin”, …

Russia

How to walk through a Berlin park

Urban green spaces should be cheering. But Elnathan John, a Nigerian novelist living in Berlin, is uncomfortable in the city’s parks<p>I am hanging out …

Germany

Victor Hugo’s surreal, forgotten art

The author of “Les Miserables” was an artistic visionary, whose spooky drawings and paintings were admired by the Surrealists<p>Victor Hugo’s posthumous …

Art History

Facebook flirting in Sierra Leone

A foreign spouse would be a golden ticket out of the country<p>Freetown, Sierra Leone’s capital, is sprawled across a wide peninsula. At its tip, green …

Sierra Leone

Man Ray’s love-hate relationship with Hollywood

The Surrealist artist struggled to balance the competing demands of his art and his wallet<p>Man Ray was by no means the first artist to flee wartime …

Avant-garde

Why “Cloverfield” risks Netflix’s reputation

If it isn’t careful, the platform will come to be seen as a dumping ground for dodgy movies<p>You used to know where you were with Hollywood …

Gugu Mbatha-Raw

Erté’s illustrations captured the look of an era

His elegant drawings, which ooze with glamour and insouciance, helped define the Art Deco movement<p>A month or two after starting his first job at a …

Art Deco

Apparently I’m pretty handsome...for an Indian

A compliment received in Bangkok turned out to be of the backhanded variety<p>It is always nice to get a compliment about your appearance, but there is …

The Simpsons

Joseph Cornell: how a reclusive artist spread his wings

The work of this magpie artist took flight when he encountered an enchanting collage<p>At a gallery in Manhattan in October 1953, Joseph Cornell …

Birds

How can I optimise my wardrobe?

An economist’s guide to dressing well<p>Captain Samuel Vimes, denizen of Terry Pratchett’s “Discworld”, posited the “Boots” theory of socioeconomic …

Clothing

The art and design of jazz-age Britain

An exhibition in London shows the impact of jazz on British culture between the two world wars<p>In 1919 two American jazz bands landed on British …

Art

Charles I: a king with an art collection to die for

He may not have been an ideal ruler but, as a new exhibition shows, he had great taste in art<p>In 1623 Charles Stuart, heir to the thrones of England, …

Art History

A postcard from Crypto-world

When Jon Boone arrived in finance’s parallel universe, he didn’t even know how to speak the language. But soon he was surfing the Bitcoin wave<p>It is …

Cryptocurrency

How Andreas Gurksy turned an Amazon depot into art

The man who took the most expensive photograph ever sold is fascinated by the infrastructure of globalisation<p>One day in the summer of 1984, Andreas …

Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur

Meet the vegans having better sex than you

“The Game Changers” is the latest of several documentaries that aim to convert men to plant-based diets<p>Can going vegan improve your sex life? Yes it …

The hair-sellers of Havana

In Cuba’s capital, a ponytail is an expensive asset<p>When Dalila Hernández Rodríguez went out in public, her mother and husband would always remind her …

Hair

Crafting a life

White-collar workers are fleeing their desks to become brewers, bakers and pickle-makers. Ryan Avent reckons the artisanal boom points to the modern …

Karl Marx

Fermented shark, anyone?

Traditional Icelandic food is an acquired taste, but it’s much nicer than it smells<p>The headless corpse is buried in gravel for up to 12 weeks while …

“Britannia”: mad as a snake and the best thing on TV

Sky Atlantic’s new drama about the Roman invasion of Britain is weird and spectacular in equal measure<p>A hawk snatches a dove out of the air, a …

Crossed wires

The first transatlantic cable was seen as a folly and a hoax. But, says Tom Standage, it heralded the greatest communications revolution in history<p>In …

James Buchanan

A sidekick for cyclists

Don’t get lost on your bike, don’t fall victim to revolting peasants and don’t let your photos let you down<p><b>Tim Martin</b>writes about TV, games and …

Cycling

America’s fallen angels

Plus, the bad boy of British opera strikes again and other musical notes<p>Ezra Furman (<i>above</i>) is on a mission. His new album, <b>Transangelic Exodus</b>, tells …

Neil Gaiman

A woman’s best friend

...plus a mummified monkey and other unexpected stories for dark evenings<p>Why aren’t more people familiar with the work of Sigrid Nunez (<i>pictured</i>)? At …

Books

Beijing’s got talent

Plus, the most expensive German TV drama ever, controversial noir in Egypt, an Indonesian black widow and a channel for Afghan women<p>Talent shows have …

Satire

An act of restoration

Three and a half centuries after his execution, Charles I’s art collection is being reassembled. Fiammetta Rocco pays court<p>To reach the scaffold …

Art

February/March 2018

Shock it to me

Can you become a better person by electrocuting yourself? Jonathan Beckman steels himself for a bolt from the blue<p>In 1961, Stanley Milgram, a …

Philip K. Dick